Archive for May, 2021

AppCache’s forgotten tales

May 31st, 2021

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Overwolf 1-Click Remote Code Execution – CVE-2021-33501

May 31st, 2021

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The Dog Poodemic Is Here. Call in the Dung-Hunting Drones

May 31st, 2021

Lockdown puppy madness has left sidewalks littered with feces. Robots that scan and scoop can help.

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3 SASE Misconceptions to Consider

May 31st, 2021

SASE is all the rage, promising things IT leaders have long dreamed about, but a purist approach may create consequences.

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Can we keep human inconsistency from confusing expert advice?

May 31st, 2021
The cover of the book Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment

Enlarge (credit: Little, Brown and Company)

Everyone has biases. And everyone knows that everyone has biases, and that these biases affect our judgements. Bias is explainable, and our brains like things they can explain.

One of the leading explainers of our biases is economist Daniel Kahneman, famed for a Nobel win and his book Thinking, Fast and Slow. He’s now teamed with Olivier Sibony and Cass Sunstein to write a book… that’s… not about bias. Entitled Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgement, it deals with—you guessed it—noise, the variability among human judgements that is the result of humans being variable. We have distinct temperaments and personalities; we are different from each other, and we are different from ourselves, certainly from year to year but also even from hour to hour.

All of that noise is totally OK. But it is totally not OK when it means that one petty thief is granted bail while another must await trial in jail, or one asylum seeker gets admitted into the US while another does not, or one child at risk of abuse gets shunted into foster care while another stays put—all because they saw a particular judge on a particular morning.

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Posted in book review, decision making, Experts, Gaming & Culture, Noise, science | Comments (0)

This Dam Acts Like a Water Cannon. Let’s Do Some Physics!

May 31st, 2021

Like a giant bucket with a hole, the Funil Hydropower Plant sprays out an enormous jet of water. We can use its speed to calculate the depth of the reservoir.

Posted in Dot Physics, science, Science / Physics and Math | Comments (0)

How to Game on a PC When You Can’t Find a Graphics Card

May 31st, 2021

Don’t want to get scammed by a scalper or pay more than double for a new GPU? We have some tips to help you keep gaming without emptying your wallet.

Posted in Gear, Gear / How To and Advice, save your money | Comments (0)

Genetic tricks of the longest-lived animals

May 31st, 2021
Image of a bat in flight

Enlarge / Bats, remarkable little things. (credit: Bernd Wolter / EyeEm)

Life, for most of us, ends far too soon—hence the effort by biomedical researchers to find ways to delay the aging process and extend our stay on Earth. But there’s a paradox at the heart of the science of aging: The vast majority of research focuses on fruit flies, nematode worms and laboratory mice, because they’re easy to work with and lots of genetic tools are available. And yet, a major reason that geneticists chose these species in the first place is because they have short lifespans. In effect, we’ve been learning about longevity from organisms that are the least successful at the game.

Today, a small number of researchers are taking a different approach and studying unusually long-lived creatures—ones that, for whatever evolutionary reasons, have been imbued with lifespans far longer than other creatures they’re closely related to. The hope is that by exploring and understanding the genes and biochemical pathways that impart long life, researchers may ultimately uncover tricks that can extend our own lifespans, too.

Everyone has a rough idea of what aging is, just from experiencing it as it happens to themselves and others. Our skin sags, our hair goes gray, joints stiffen and creak—all signs that our components—that is, proteins and other biomolecules—aren’t what they used to be. As a result, we’re more prone to chronic diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes—and the older we get, the more likely we are to die each year. “You live, and by living you produce negative consequences like molecular damage. This damage accumulates over time,” says Vadim Gladyshev, who researches aging at Harvard Medical School. “In essence, this is aging.”

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Your Amazon Devices to Automatically Share Your Wi-Fi With Neighbors

May 31st, 2021

Starting June 8, Amazon will automatically enable a feature on its family of hardware devices, including Echo speakers, Ring Video Doorbells, Ring Floodlight Cams, and Ring Spotlight Cams, that will share a small part of your Internet bandwidth with nearby neighbors — unless you choose to opt-out.
To that effect, the company intends to register all compatible devices that are operational in the

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Can Your Business Email Be Spoofed? Check Your Domain Security Now!

May 31st, 2021

Are you aware of how secure your domain is? In most organizations, there is an assumption that their domains are secure and within a few months, but the truth soon dawns on them that it isn’t.
Spotting someone spoofing your domain name is one way to determine if your security is unsatisfactory – this means that someone is impersonating you (or confusing some of your recipients) and releasing

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