D-Wave releases its next-generation quantum annealing chip

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Image of a chip surrounded by complicated support hardware.

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Today, quantum computing company D-Wave is announcing the availability of its next-generation quantum annealer, a specialized processor that uses quantum effects to solve optimization and minimization problems. The hardware itself isn't much of a surprise—D-Wave was discussing its details months ago—but D-Wave talked with Ars about the challenges of building a chip with over a million individual quantum devices. And the company is coupling the hardware's release to the availability of a new software stack that functions a bit like middleware between the quantum hardware and classical computers.

Quantum annealing

Quantum computers being built by companies like Google and IBM are general-purpose, gate-based machines. They can solve any problem and should show a vast acceleration for specific classes of problems—or they will, as soon as the gate count gets high enough. Right now, these quantum computers are limited to a few-dozen gates and have no error correction. Bringing them up to the scale needed presents a series of difficult technical challenges.

D-Wave's machine is not general-purpose; it's technically a quantum annealer, not a quantum computer. It performs calculations that find low-energy states for different configurations of the hardware's quantum devices. As such, it will only work if a computing problem can be translated into an energy-minimization problem in one of the chip's possible configurations. That's not as limiting as it might sound, since many forms of optimization can be translated to an energy minimization problem, including things like complicated scheduling issues and protein structures.

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Posted in algorithms, Computer science, D-Wave, quantum annealer, quantum mechanics, science | Comments (0)

Exploiting fine-grained AWS IAM permissions for total cloud compromise: a real world example (part 1/2) – @securfreakazoid

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/securfreakazoid
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How to Win Any Debate

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Arguing, especially with strangers on the internet, is generally a bad idea—but if you have to, here's how to win.

Posted in fight me, Gear, Gear / How To and Advice | Comments (0)

Shifting Left of Left: Why Secure Code Isn’t Always Quality Code

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Enabling engineers to share responsibility for security and empowering them to erase common vulnerabilities are good starting points.

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LIVE Webinar on Zerologon Vulnerability: Technical Analysis and Detection

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
I am sure that many of you have by now heard of a recently disclosed critical Windows server vulnerability—called Zerologon—that could let hackers completely take over enterprise networks. For those unaware, in brief, all supported versions of the Windows Server operating systems are vulnerable to a critical privilege escalation bug that resides in the Netlogon Remote Control Protocol for Domain

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Trump’s FCC Is Using Junk Data to Downplay Broadband Woes

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Tens of millions of Americans have either cripplingly slow or no internet at all. And the FCC's shameful practices are making a bad situation worse.

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Man refused to disband party that violated COVID order, gets year in jail

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Picture of a jail cell in which a man's handcuffed hands are sticking out through the bars.

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A Maryland judge sentenced a man to one year in jail after finding him guilty of throwing two large parties in violation of a state pandemic order that banned large gatherings. Police were called to the man's home twice in one week, and he refused to disband the party on the second occasion, authorities said.

Shawn Marshall Myers, 42, was sentenced on Friday at the District Court of Maryland, said an announcement by the state's attorney for Charles County. Myers' legal troubles began on March 22 when "multiple officers responded to Myers' residence... for the report of a large party" violating Governor Larry Hogan's order in which "large gatherings were strictly prohibited," the state's attorney office said.

Myers allegedly hosted about 50 people at the party. "Upon arrival, officers told Myers that his party violated the current mandate. Myers was argumentative with officers but eventually agreed to disband his party," the state's attorney office said.

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Posted in coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, Policy | Comments (0)

Google announces crackdown on in-app billing, aimed at Netflix and Spotify

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Google announces crackdown on in-app billing, aimed at Netflix and Spotify

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With a lot of focus lately on how smartphone app developers are treated on Apple's and Google's app stores, Google has decided right now is a great time to announce more stringent app store billing rules. A new post from the official Android Developer Blog promises a crackdown on in-app billing that sounds like it's targeted at big streaming services like Netflix and Spotify.

Google's post really beats around the bush trying to sugar-coat this announcement, but it starts off by saying, "We’ve always required developers who distribute their apps on Play to use Google Play’s billing system if they offer in-app purchases of digital goods, and pay a service fee from a percentage of the purchase." This rule has not been enforced, though, and a lot of big developers have just ignored Google's billing requirements. Today, Netflix and Spotify don't use Google's in-app billing and instead kick new accounts out to a Web browser, where the companies can use PayPal or direct credit card processing to dodge Google's 30-percent fees.

"We have clarified the language in our Payments Policy to be more explicit that all developers selling digital goods in their apps are required to use Google Play’s billing system," Google continues. "For those who already have an app on Google Play that requires technical work to integrate our billing system, we do not want to unduly disrupt their roadmaps and are giving a year (until September 30, 2021) to complete any needed updates."

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The Hidden Dangers of Network Printers

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
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State-Sponsored Hacking Groups Increasingly Use Cloud & Open Source Infrastructure

September 29th, 2020
by The Feeder
Microsoft shuts down Azure Active Directory instances used by attackers to evade detection and warns that the use of open source tools by espionage groups is growing.

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