From theory to practice: analysis and PoC development for CVE-2020-28018 (User-After-Free in Exim)

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
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The Best Way to Get a VR Workout (That’s Also Fun)

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
Strap on that headset and grab your controllers. It's time to sweat.

Posted in Gear, Gear / How To and Advice, stick with it | Comments (0)

Geology Students Did Fieldwork During Covid—With Video Games

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
With travel and real-life fieldwork shut down, a couple of enterprising professors started with simulations of Italy and Scotland, then took to the stars.

Posted in School of Rock, science, Science / Environment | Comments (0)

The chip shortage is driving up tech prices–starting with TVs

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
The chip shortage is driving up tech prices–starting with TVs

Enlarge (credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images)

Televisions, laptops, and tablets have been in high demand during the Covid-19 pandemic, as people worked and learned via Zoom, socialized over Skype, and binged on Netflix to alleviate the lockdown blues. But all that extra screen time also helped set in motion a semiconductor supply crunch that is causing prices for some gadgets to spike—starting with TVs.

In recent months, the price of larger TV models has shot up around 30 percent compared to last summer, according to market research company NPD. The jump is a direct result of the current chip crisis, and underscores that a fix is more complicated than simply ramping up production. It may also be only a matter of time before other gadgets that use the same circuitry—laptops, tablets, and VR headsets among them—experience similar sticker shock.

Some manufacturers have already flagged potential price rises. Asus, a Taiwanese computer maker, said during a quarterly earnings call in March that a shortage of components would mean “price hikes further upstream,” which would likely affect consumers.

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Posted in chip shortage, Gaming & Culture, internet of shit, Internet of things, smart tvs, Tech | Comments (0)

WhatsApp’s New Privacy Policy Just Kicked In

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
Instead of a hard cutoff, the messaging app will gradually degrade and eventually cease to function if you don’t accept the changes.

Posted in Privacy, security, Security / Privacy | Comments (0)

The 16 Best Weekend Deals on Headphones, Tablets, and More

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
Are you trying to spend all your recently acquired crypto riches? We found discounts on tripods, wireless chargers, and many other gadgets.

Posted in deals, Gear, Gear / Deals | Comments (0)

The Wondrous, Tedious Ocean of Subnautica: Below Zero

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
The game is, for the most part, a sublime seafaring sequel. Too bad it often feels like a grind.

Posted in culture, Culture / Video Games, dive in | Comments (0)

Colonial Pipeline paid a $5 million ransom—and kept a vicious cycle turning

May 15th, 2021
by The Feeder
Colonial Pipeline paid a $5 million ransom—and kept a vicious cycle turning

Enlarge (credit: Sean Rayford | Getty Images)

Nearly a week after a ransomware attack led Colonial Pipeline to halt fuel distribution on the East Coast, reports emerged on Friday that the company paid a 75 bitcoin ransom—worth as much as $5 million, depending on the time of payment—in an attempt to restore service more quickly. And while the company was able to restart operations Wednesday night, the decision to give in to hackers' demands will only embolden other groups going forward. Real progress against the ransomware epidemic, experts say, will require more companies to say no.

Not to say that doing so is easy. The FBI and other law enforcement groups have long discouraged ransomware victims from paying digital extortion fees, but in practice many organizations resort to paying. They either don't have the backups and other infrastructure necessary to recover otherwise, can't or don't want to take the time to recover on their own, or decide that it's cheaper to just quietly pay the ransom and move on. Ransomware groups increasingly vet their victims' financials before springing their traps, allowing them to set the highest possible price that their victims can still potentially afford.

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Posted in Biz & IT, colonial pipeline, ransomware, security | Comments (0)

Pipeline attacker Darkside suddenly goes dark—here’s what we know

May 14th, 2021
by The Feeder
Pipeline attacker Darkside suddenly goes dark—here’s what we know

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Darkside—the ransomware group that disrupted gasoline distribution across a wide swath of the US this week—has gone dark, leaving it unclear if the group is ceasing, suspending, or altering its operations or is simply orchestrating an exit scam.

On Thursday, all eight of the dark web sites Darkside used to communicate with the public went down, and they remain down as of publication time. Overnight, a post attributed to Darkside claimed, without providing any evidence, that the group’s website and content distribution infrastructure had been seized by law enforcement, along with the cryptocurrency it had received from victims.

The dog ate our funds

“At the moment, these servers cannot be accessed via SSH, and the hosting panels have been blocked,” the post stated, according to a translation of the Russian-language post published Friday by security firm Intel471. “The hosting support service doesn't provide any information except ‘at the request of law enforcement authorities.’ In addition, a couple of hours after the seizure, funds from the payment server (belonging to us and our clients) were withdrawn to an unknown account.”

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Posted in Biz & IT, colonial pipeline, Darkside, ransomware, REvil, Tech | Comments (0)

Researchers force two mice to hang out and induce FOMO in a third

May 14th, 2021
by The Feeder
Researchers force two mice to hang out and induce FOMO in a third

Enlarge (credit: David Aubrey)

Since its advent in 2005, a technique called optogenetics has made it vastly easier to link neural activity with behavior and to understand how neurons and brain regions are connected to each other. Neuroscientists just pick the (animal) neurons they’re interested in, genetically engineer them to express a light-responsive protein, and then stimulate them with the right type of light. This technique can be used to inhibit or excite a select subset of neurons in living, breathing, moving animals, illuminating which neural networks dictate the animals' behaviors and decisions.

Taking advantage of work done in miniaturizing the optogenetic hardware, researchers have now used optogenetics to alter the activity in parts of the brain that influence social interactions in mice. And they’ve exerted a disturbing level of control over the way the mice interact.

Going small

A big limitation for early optogenetic studies was that the wires and optical fibers required to get light into an animal’s brain also get in the animals’ way, impeding their movements and potentially skewing results. Newer implantable wireless devices were developed about five years ago, but they can only be placed near certain brain regions. They're also too tiny to accommodate many circuit components and receiver antennas, and they have to be programmed beforehand. Pity the poor would-be mind controllers who have to deal with such limited tools.

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Posted in Biology, Neuroscience, optogenetics, science, social behavior | Comments (0)