Informal Transit Is Crucial for Some. Can It Weather Covid-19?

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
The pandemic highlights the vulnerability of workers for private transportation services, which are essential to mobility in global south cities.

Posted in Transportation, Transportation / Cities and Infrastructure | Comments (0)

A Grad Student Solved the Epic Conway Knot Problem—in a Week

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
Lisa Piccirillo encountered the more than 50-year-old question by chance at a conference. Her solution relies on a classical tool called the knot trace.

Posted in science, Science / Physics and Math | Comments (0)

Gears of war: When mechanical analog computers ruled the waves

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
The Advanced Gun System, left, is intended to take on the role of the battleship's 16-inch guns, right.  Aside from its GPS-guided shell, the digital technology of the AGS's fire control system does exactly what the USS Iowa's Rangekeeper Mark 8 did—just with fewer people and less weight.

The Advanced Gun System, left, is intended to take on the role of the battleship's 16-inch guns, right. Aside from its GPS-guided shell, the digital technology of the AGS's fire control system does exactly what the USS Iowa's Rangekeeper Mark 8 did—just with fewer people and less weight. (credit: US Navy)

We are resurfacing this feature from 2014 for your reading pleasure on this holiday weekend.

The USS Zumwalt, the latest destroyer now undergoing acceptance trials, comes with a new type of naval artillery: the Advanced Gun System (AGS). The automated AGS can fire 10 rocket-assisted, precision-guided projectiles per minute at targets over 100 miles away.

Those projectiles use GPS and inertial guidance to improve the gun’s accuracy to a 50 meter (164 feet) circle of probable error—meaning that half of its GPS-guided shells will fall within that distance from the target. But take away the fancy GPS shells, and the AGS and its digital fire control system are no more accurate than mechanical analog technology that is nearly a century old.

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Posted in Biz & IT, Features, Gaming & Culture, science | Comments (0)

Now’s The Perfect Time to Start Using a Password Manager

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
Time has no meaning, and we're all stuck in front of screens. You may as well secure your life while you're always online.

Posted in security, Security / Security Advice | Comments (0)

Netflix’s Plan to Auto-Cancel Subscriptions Is Radically Sane

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
If you haven't used your account in two years, the streaming giant will stop charging you. Imagine that.

Posted in Gear, Gear / Trends | Comments (0)

Inside the NSA’s Secret Tool for Mapping Your Social Network

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
Edward Snowden revealed the agency’s phone-record tracking program. But thanks to “precomputed contact chaining,” that database was much more powerful than anyone knew.

Posted in Backchannel | Comments (0)

On the Moon, astronaut pee will be a hot commodity

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
Artist's conception of a lunar habitat.

Enlarge / Future moon bases could be built with 3D printers that mix materials such as Moon regolith, water, and astronauts’ urine. (credit: ESA/Foster and Partners)

Ever since President Donald Trump directed NASA to get boots on the Moon by 2024, the agency and its partners have been hard at work trying to make it happen. Late last month, NASA awarded contracts to three companies to develop a crewed lunar lander, but getting to the Moon is just the start. The agency also plans to build a permanent Moon basebefore the end of the decade and use it as a stepping stone to Mars.

If astronauts are going to spend weeks at a time on the Moon, they’re going to have to figure out how to live off the land—er, regolith. It’s too expensive to ship everything from Earth, which means they’ll have to get creative with the limited resources on the lunar surface. Moon dirt is a great building material and there’s water in the form of ice at the south pole that can be turned into rocket fuel. But the hottest commodity of them all may very well turn out to be an astronaut’s own pee.

Earlier this year, a team of European researchers demonstrated that urea, the second-most common compound in human urine after water, can be mixed with Moon dirt and used for construction. The resulting material is a geopolymer, which has similar properties to concrete and could potentially be used to build landing pads, habitats, and other structures on the Moon.

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Posted in AI, CO2, science | Comments (0)

Finding and Fixing TLS Misconfigurations with TLS Profiler

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/dfett
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There’s a Jailbreak Out for the Current Version of iOS

May 24th, 2020
by The Feeder
The Unc0ver tool works on all versions of iOS from 11 to 13.5, the current release.

Posted in security, Security / Security News | Comments (0)

Bypassing CAPTCHA with Visually-Impaired Robots

May 23rd, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/drstarskymrhutch
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Posted in netsec | Comments (0)