Archive for the ‘Internet of things’ Category

Smart Devices Can Be Hijacked to Track Your Body Movements And Activities Remotely

August 20th, 2017

If your smartphones, tablets, smart refrigerators, smart TVs and other smart devices are smart enough to make your life easier, their smart behavior could also be leveraged by hackers to steal data, invade your privacy or spy on you, if not secured properly.

One such experiment has recently been performed by a team of student hackers, demonstrating a new attack method to turn smart devices

Posted in google tracking, hacking smart device, Hacking Smart TV, Internet of things, smart device, Smartphone, Technology News | Comments (0)

Unpatchable Flaw in Modern Cars Allows Hackers to Disable Safety Features

August 17th, 2017

Today, many automobiles companies are offering vehicles that run on the mostly drive-by-wire system, which means a majority of car’s functions—from instrument cluster to steering, brakes, and accelerator—are electronically controlled.

No doubt these auto-control systems make your driving experience much better, but at the same time, they also increase the risk of getting hacked.

Car Hacking

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Five Billion Tests Later: IoT and Industrial Control System Protocols Raise Alarms

August 9th, 2017

In-brief: Close to five billion “fuzzing” tests conducted during 2016 reveal protocols used by industrial control systems, vehicles and Internet of Things devices to be weaker, on average, with many crashing hundreds of times and revealing vulnerabilities that could be used by malicious actors.  A study of 4.8 billion automated…

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Posted in connected devices, critical infrastructure, fuzzing, Internet of things, protocol, published research, Reports, software, software development, supply chain, survey, Top Stories, trends, vulnerabilities | Comments (0)

Siemens, DHS warn of “low skill” exploits against CT and PET Scanners

August 4th, 2017

Enlarge (credit: University of Queensland)

The Department of Homeland Security’s Industrial Control System Computer Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) has issued an alert warning of four vulnerabilities in multiple medical molecular imaging systems from Siemens. All of these systems have publicly available exploits that could allow an attacker to execute code remotely—potentially damaging or compromising the safety of the systems. “An attacker with a low skill would be able to exploit these vulnerabilities,” ICS-CERT warned.

Siemens identified the vulnerabilities in a customer alert on July 26, warning that the vulnerabilities were highly critical—giving them a rating of 9.8 out of a possible 10 using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. The systems affected include Siemens CT, PET, and SPECT scanners and medical imaging workflow systems based on Windows 7.

One of the vulnerabilities is in the built-in Window Web server running on the systems. “An unauthenticated remote attacker could execute arbitrary code by sending specially crafted HTTP requests to the Microsoft Web server (port 80/tcp and port 443/tcp) of affected devices,” Siemens warned in its alert. The bug in the Web server software allows code injection onto the devices.

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Posted in Health IT, hospital it, Internet of things, Tech | Comments (0)

Hacking A $1500 ‘Smart Gun’ With $15 Magnets

July 29th, 2017

I think we should stop going crazy over the smart things unless it’s secure enough to be called SMART—from a toaster, security cameras, and routers to the computers and cars—everything is hackable.

But the worst part comes in when these techs just require some cheap and easily available kinds of stuff to get compromised.

Want example? It took just cheap magnets purchased from Amazon online

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Hackers Could Easily Take Remote Control of Your Segway Hoverboards

July 19th, 2017

If you are hoverboard rider, you should be concerned about yourself.

Thomas Kilbride, a security researcher from security firm IOActive, have discovered several critical vulnerabilities in Segway Ninebot miniPRO that could be exploited by hackers to remotely take “full control” over the hoverboard within range and leave riders out-of-control.
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Segway Ninebot miniPRO is a

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Remotely Exploitable Flaw Puts Millions of Internet-Connected Devices at Risk

July 18th, 2017

Security researchers have discovered a critical remotely exploitable vulnerability in an open-source software development library used by major manufacturers of the Internet-of-Thing devices that eventually left millions of devices vulnerable to hacking.

The vulnerability (CVE-2017-9765), discovered by researchers at the IoT-focused security firm Senrio, resides in the software development

Posted in buffer overflow vulnerability, gSOAP toolkit, hacking news, Internet of things, iot devices, remote code execution, smart device, software development, Vulnerability | Comments (0)

With an Eye on IoT Security ARM buys Simulity for $15m

July 14th, 2017

In-brief: ARM’s purchase of Simulity adds the ability to do over the air updates to embedded SIM chips and highlights ARM’s efforts to build out security and management at IoT scale.  A tiny deal this week by ARM could have a big impact on the security of the Internet of Things. The company, which makes a wide range of low power…

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Posted in ARM, connected devices, hardware, harman, Internet of things, M&A, mirai, Network, OTA update, over the air update, Patching, Platform, sensor, SIM card, smart infrastructure, software, Top Stories | Comments (0)

The ‘Beginners Guide To IoT’

July 11th, 2017

You’ve probably heard the term ‘smart’ being placed in front of everyday objects such as watches, locks and even cars. Over the past couple of years, the term is being used more than ever as more devices become ‘smart’. These devices now impact nearly every aspect of our lives but, as a consumer, where do you begin to understand the ‘Internet of Things’ or IoT? With so many of us relying on the internet and the cost to connect decreasing, more and more devices are being built with Wi-Fi and sensor capabilities to enable us to get connected.

As the name suggests, IoT refers to the connection between an object and the Internet, with the purpose of making products ‘smarter’ and allowing users to operate devices from afar, whether that’s from a computer or other smart device. For example, a smart lock would lock and unlock a door when it receives authorisation from its user’s Wi-Fi-connected device. Similarly, an alarm or smoke detector that is ‘smart’ would alert the homeowner if their home was under the threat of a fire or burglary, as well as collecting the home’s behavioural patterns along the way.

So how does IoT work? Usually connected via Bluetooth, Wi-Fi or Radio-Frequency Identification (R-FID), devices or ‘Things’ collect and transmit data between each other, allowing users to gain control of an object such as a TV, car or a household appliance. This process is called machine-to-machine (M2M) communication.

IoT is playing a larger role in our everyday lives and is being applied to more and more industries each day. Fridges, washing machines and even medical healthcare monitors are all becoming smart and a consequence of this is the risk of security and privacy breaches much closer to home. It is therefore critical that consumers are protecting themselves appropriately and making sure their data doesn’t end up in the wrong hands.

Here are a few tips we’d recommend running through to protect yourself:

1. A simple Google search will allow you to research products in depth before and after purchasing them from a trustworthy company — this way you are aware of any vulnerabilities your product may have and can take the necessary measures to protect your privacy.

2. Secure your router and IoT devices with firmware like the McAfee Secure Home Platform and ensure they’re set with strong passwords to avoid any unauthorised access.

3. Lastly, consider two-step authentication — this can boost your device’s security even further and reduce the chances of hackers breaching them.

To keep up-to-date with the latest cybersecurity news, take a look at the McAfee Security blog here.

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The Trends & Challenges Facing The Internet Of Things

July 11th, 2017

The Internet of Things, or IoT, is now commonplace in society today. Since the term was first coined back in the 80’s, connected devices have changed our lives in ways many of us could only dream of. However, whilst the growth has been significant, integrating IoT devices into everyday life even further is not without its challenges. In this post, I’m going to look at some of the trends that will help take IoT integration even further, as well as some of the hurdles being faced.

Trends

Hands Free

Today, the most common way of interacting with IoT devices and electronics is primarily touch. However, the ability to use voice is shaking up how consumers and technology interact. Voice is making a significant impact on our everyday lives and it will continue to become more prominent as the technology evolves. Very recently, we’ve seen the introduction of Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Home devices. With the likes of Siri, Cortana and Assistant already being used outside of smartphones and tablets, it will only be a matter of time before consumers are controlling their IoT devices by voice. It has even begun to make its way into cars, as we’ve seen with Nissan introducing Cortana to the dashboard interface. Using our hands could well become a thing of the past!

Big Data & Machine Learning

At the very core, big data and IoT need each other. Both are powerful trends that are reshaping the way consumers and businesses operate. However, the value of IoT for big tech firms isn’t just in the hardware, it also lies in the huge amounts of data the devices are producing. Data is becoming the ‘new oil’ and IoT devices increase the amount of data companies have on consumers, making them incredibly valuable. Companies will start to use Artificial Intelligence (AI) to analyse the huge pools of data allowing them to provide a much more tailored offering with devices eventually beginning to learn and adapt to how we use them. With AI integration, it gives companies the ability to analyse data and learn, with devices ultimately becoming automated — a fundamental shift in how consumers interact with their devices.

Challenges

Safety & Security

With more devices becoming connected and even more planned for the future, one of the biggest elements that needs to be addressed to make IoT a success is making sure devices are safe and secure. A recent report from Gartner predicted there will be 8.4 billion connected ‘things’ in 2017 and as many as 20 billion by 2020 — a huge amount of devices that if breached, could at the very least expose critical user data, but could also do much worse when we consider how connected hospitals and cities are becoming. If we take hospitals for example, an attack on the network could have huge ramifications on patients so as the reliability on technology increases, the security must mirror that. Looking at things much closer to home, implementing the right security platforms, like our Smart Home software will make sure cyber attacks on your connected devices in the home don’t happen.

Multiple Devices

As we’ve mentioned before, the exponential growth of IoT means more and more devices will be using a network, which will in turn place an incredible amount of strain on our networks. The result of an overburdened network could mean a drop in service, which is something most businesses and consumers would be keen to avoid. How many times has your internet connection dropped or your WiFi cut out for a few seconds? It’s not uncommon in the home today and the consequences are probably minimal, but imagine that happening for businesses — it could be catastrophic. Seamless integration is critical for the successful use of IoT.

To keep up-to-date with the latest cybersecurity news, take a look at the McAfee Security blog here.

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