Archive for the ‘machine learning’ Category

More than an auto-pilot, AI charts its course in aviation

December 5th, 2018
Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

Enlarge / Boeing 787 Dreamliner. (credit: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Welcome to Ars UNITE, our week-long virtual conference on the ways that innovation brings unusual pairings together. Each day this week from Wednesday through Friday, we're bringing you a pair of stories about facing the future. Today's focus is on AI in transportation—buckle up!

Ask anyone what they think of when the words "artificial intelligence" and aviation are combined, and it's likely the first things they'll mention are drones. But autonomous aircraft are only a fraction of the impact that advances in machine learning and other artificial intelligence (AI) technologies will have in aviation—the technologies' reach could encompass nearly every aspect of the industry. Aircraft manufacturers and airlines are investing significant resources in AI technologies in applications that span from the flightdeck to the customer's experience.

Automated systems have been part of commercial aviation for years. Thanks to the adoption of "fly-by-wire" controls and automated flight systems, machine learning and AI technology are moving into a crew-member role in the cockpit. Rather than simply reducing the workload on pilots, these systems are on the verge of becoming what amounts to another co-pilot. For example, systems originally developed for unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) safety—such as Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) for traffic situational awareness—have migrated into manned aircraft cockpits. And emerging systems like the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) are being developed to increase safety when there's a need to compensate for aircraft handling characteristics. They use sensor data to adjust the control surfaces of an aircraft automatically, based on flight conditions.

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Posted in AI, analytics, ars-unite-2018, Artificial intelligence, aviation, Biz & IT, civil aviation, Features, fly-by-wire, machine learning | Comments (0)

SNDBOX: AI-Powered Online Automated Malware Analysis Platform

December 5th, 2018
Looking for an automated malware analysis software? Something like a 1-click solution that doesn't require any installation or configuration…a platform that can scale up your research time… technology that can provide data-driven explanations… well, your search is over! Israeli cybersecurity and malware researchers today at Black Hat conference launch a revolutionary machine learning and

Posted in Artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence malware, automated malware analysis, cyber security, cybersecurity tool, machine learning, Malware analysis, malware analysis tool, malware scanner, SNDBOX | Comments (0)

Apple published a surprising amount of detail about how the HomePod works

December 3rd, 2018
Image of a HomePod

Enlarge / Siri on Apple's HomePod speaker. (credit: Jeff Dunn)

Today, Apple published a long and informative blog post by its audio software engineering and speech teams about how they use machine learning to make Siri responsive on the HomePod, and it reveals a lot about why Apple has made machine learning such a focus of late.

The post discusses working in a far-field setting where users are calling on Siri from any number of locations around the room relative to the HomePod's location. The premise is essentially that making Siri work on the HomePod is harder than on the iPhone for that reason. The device must compete with loud music playback from itself.

Apple addresses these issues with multiple microphones along with machine learning methods—specifically:

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Posted in AI, apple, audio, HomePod, machine learning, Tech | Comments (0)

Apple walks Ars through the iPad Pro’s A12X system on a chip

November 7th, 2018
The 2018, 12.9-inch iPad Pro.

Enlarge / The 2018, 12.9-inch iPad Pro. (credit: Samuel Axon)

BROOKLYN—Apple's new iPad Pro sports several new features of note, including the most dramatic aesthetic redesign in years, Face ID, new Pencil features, and the very welcome move to USB-C. But the star of the show is the new A12X system on a chip (SoC).

Apple made some big claims about the A12X during its presentation announcing the product: that it has twice the graphics performance of the A10X; that it has 90 percent faster multi-core performance than its predecessor; that it matches the GPU power of the Xbox One S game console with no fan and at a fraction of the size; that it has 1,000 times faster graphics performance than the original iPad released eight years ago; that it's faster than 92 percent of all portable PCs.

If you've read our iPad Pro review, you know most of those claims hold up. Apple’s latest iOS devices aren’t perfect, but even the platform’s biggest detractors recognize that the company is leading the market when it comes to mobile CPU and GPU performance—not by a little, but by a lot. It's all done on custom silicon designed within Apple—a different approach than that taken by any mainstream Android or Windows device.

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Posted in A12X, Anand Lal Shimpi, apple, ar, CPU, Features, GPU, Interview, ipad, ipad pro, ISP, machine learning, Neural Engine, Phil Schiller, silicon, Tech | Comments (0)

AMD outlines its future: 7nm GPUs with PCIe 4, Zen 2, Zen 3, Zen 4

November 6th, 2018
AMD Radeon Instinct MI60

Enlarge / AMD Radeon Instinct MI60 (credit: AMD)

AMD today charted out its plans for the next few years of product development, with an array of new CPUs and GPUs in the development pipeline.

On the GPU front are two new datacenter-oriented GPUs: the Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50. Based on the Vega architecture and built on TSMC's 7nm process, the cards are aimed not primarily at graphics (despite what one might think given that they're called GPUs) but rather at machine learning, high-performance computing, and rendering applications.

MI60 will come with 32GB of ECC HBM2 (second-generation High-Bandwidth Memory) while the MI50 gets 16GB, and both have a memory bandwidth up to 1TB/s. ECC is also used to protect all internal memory within the GPUs themselves. The cards will also support PCIe 4.0 (which doubles the transfer rate of PCIe 3.0) and direct GPU-to-GPU links using AMD's Infinity Fabric. This will offer up to 200GB/s of bandwidth (three times more than PCIe 4) between up to 4 GPUs.

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Posted in 10nm, 7nm, AMD, CPU, GPU, Intel, machine learning, processors, Tech, Zen | Comments (0)

Garbage in, garbage out: a cautionary tale about machine learning

July 26th, 2017

Security based on machine learning is only as great as the data it feeds on, as Sophos data scientist Hillary Sanders explains at Black Hat 2017

Posted in Black Hat, Black Hat 2017, deep learning, machine learning, Malware analysis | Comments (0)

Garbage in, garbage out: a cautionary tale about machine learning

July 26th, 2017

Security based on machine learning is only as great as the data it feeds on, as Sophos data scientist Hillary Sanders explains at Black Hat 2017

Posted in Black Hat, Black Hat 2017, deep learning, machine learning, Malware analysis | Comments (0)

Where are the holes in machine learning – and can we fix them?

July 26th, 2017

Machine learning algorithms are increasingly a target for the bad guys – but the industry is working to stop them, explains Sophos chief data scientist Joshua Saxe

Posted in BSidesLV, deep learning, machine learning | Comments (0)

For better machine-based malware analysis, add a slice of LIME

July 25th, 2017

Adding a slice of LIME to machine learning can take it from the ‘what’ to the why’

Posted in BSidesLV, deep learning, LIME, machine learning | Comments (0)

Airbnb – the heartache of fake holiday scams

June 15th, 2017

Scammers are using all sorts of techniques to get around Airbnb’s anti-fraud detection. Don’t get caught out!

Posted in Airbnb, Airbnb Trust and Safety Team, fraud detection, machine learning, payment scam, scams | Comments (0)