Archive for the ‘hybrid’ Category

Love the hardware, hate the UI: The Acura MDX Sport Hybrid

December 13th, 2018
The Acura MDX Sport Hybrid.

Enlarge / The Acura MDX Sport Hybrid. (credit: Eric Bangeman)

If you're a technology enthusiast—and you obviously are, because you're reading Ars Technica—you'll know that poor software or a bad UI can drag down even the best hardware. It's frustrating, and not just because lousy software can make using the newest, shiniest gear less fun. The frustration is also fueled by the vision of what could have been if the manufacturer had truly gotten its act together.

That, in a nutshell, describes my week with the Acura MDX Sport Hybrid.

The MDX is the first hybrid SUV from Acura. It was refreshed for the 2017 model year, and, aside from a few new color options, it is essentially unchanged for 2019. It's a three-row, midsize SUV that sits in the same luxury segment occupied by the Infiniti QX60 (look for our review soon), Audi Q7, Volvo XC90, and Lexus RX 350L. It has a 3.0L, 24-valve V6 under the hood, accompanied by three electric motors—borrowed from the hybrid NSX supercar no less. There's also a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission that works sans torque convertor, which Acura says improves its efficiency.

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Posted in acura, Acura MDX, cars, hybrid | Comments (0)

1,000hp hybrid hypercars are the next big thing, and McLaren’s is called the BP23

March 23rd, 2017

McLaren

Pity the humble hypercar. For a brief moment in time you’re the hottest thing on four wheels, splashed across thousands of desktop wallpapers (and bedroom walls, if car posters are still a thing). But these days that kind of star power doesn’t last long. Blame the companies that build them. You’d think it would be hard to top something like a McLaren P1, a hybrid with 903hp (673kW) and a $1.6 million price tag, but that’s just what McLaren intends to do with the next car in its “Ultimate” series, the BP23.

The BP23 is still two years off, and details are scarce on the ground. It will be a hybrid and have even more power than the P1, and more advanced aerodynamics.

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Posted in Adrian Newey, Aston MArtin, Cars Technica, hybrid, Hypercar, McLaren, mercedes-AMG | Comments (0)

Hyundai Ioniq and Kia Niro review: Korean tanks parked on Japan’s lawn

January 4th, 2017

Enlarge

Specs at a glance: 2016 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid
Body type Five-door hatchback
Layout Front-wheel drive
Powertrain 1.6L 4-cylinder Atkinson cycle petrol engine, with electric hybrid drive and 1.56kWh Li-ion battery
Transmission Six-speed automatic DCT
Horsepower 105ps (petrol engine) / 32kW (electric motor) / 104kW/141ps (combined)
Torque 147Nm (petrol engine) / 170Nm (electric motor) / 265Nm (combined)
Suspension MacPherson strut (front) / Multi-link (rear)
Tyres 195/65 R15
Top speed 115mph
CO2 79g/km
Combined fuel economy 83.1mpg
Weight 1,870kg
Wheelbase 2,700mm
Dimensions 4,470 x 1,820 x 1,450mm (LWH)
Base price £19,940

Sometimes the dice just roll the right way. I had been scheduled to spend a week kicking the tyres of Kia’s new Niro at the end of August but a mixup with the booking and then the theft of a press fleet car meant that I didn’t actually get my hands on it until the last week of September, which happened to be a week before the UK press launch of the Hyundai Ioniq.

So I decided to tackle them all at once. The Ioniq (that’s “ionic” rather than “ion-eek”) will eventually be available in three guises: pure electric, hybrid—which I’m reviewing here—and a plug-in hybrid due to arrive in Blighty next spring. As it happens, the Ioniq hybrid drivetrain is also found in the Kia Niro (pronounced like the actor rather than the pen), while a plug-in version of the Niro will also appear down the line.

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Posted in Cars Technica, EV, hybrid, hyundai, Hyundai-Kia Automotive Group, Ioniq, Kia, Niro | Comments (0)