Archive for the ‘linux’ Category

Kali Linux 2019.1 Released — Operating System For Hackers

February 18th, 2019
Wohooo! Great news for hackers and penetration testers. Offensive Security has just released Kali Linux 2019.1, the first 2019 version of its Swiss army knife for cybersecurity professionals. The latest version of Kali Linux operating system includes kernel up to version 4.19.13 and patches for numerous bugs, along with many updated software, like Metasploit, theHarvester, DBeaver, and more.

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Snapd Flaw Lets Attackers Gain Root Access On Linux Systems

February 13th, 2019
Ubuntu and some other Linux distributions suffer from a severe privilege escalation vulnerability that could allow a local attacker or a malicious program to obtain root privileges and total control over the targeted system. Dubbed "Dirty_Sock" and identified as CVE-2019-7304, the vulnerability was discovered by security researcher Chris Moberly, who privately disclosed it to Canonical, the

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RunC Flaw Lets Attackers Escape Linux Containers to Gain Root on Hosts

February 12th, 2019
A serious security vulnerability has been discovered in the core runC container code that affects several open-source container management systems, potentially allowing attackers to escape Linux container and obtain unauthorized, root-level access to the host operating system. The vulnerability, identified as CVE-2019-5736, was discovered by open source security researchers Adam Iwaniuk and

Posted in Amazon AWS, Cloud hosting, docker, Google Cloud, hacking news, how to hack linux, Kubernetes, linux, linux container, Linux hacking, redhat linux, SELinux, Suse Linux, Virtualization software | Comments (0)

Linux Mint 19.1: A sneaky popular distro skips upheaval, offers small upgrades

January 28th, 2019
Cinnamon 4.0's new look in Linux Mint 19.1

Enlarge / Cinnamon 4.0's new look in Linux Mint 19.1 (credit: Scott Gilbertson)

While Ubuntu and Red Hat grabbed most of the Linux headlines last year, Linux Mint, once the darling of the tech press, had a relatively quiet year. Perhaps that's understandable with IBM buying Red Hat and Canonical moving back to the GNOME desktop. For the most part Linux Mint and its developers seemed to keep their heads down, working away while others enjoyed the limelight. Still, the Linux Mint team did churn out version 19, which brought the distro up to the Ubuntu 18.04 base.

While the new release may not have garnered mass attention, and probably isn't anyone's top pick for "the cloud," Linux Mint nevertheless remains the distro I see most frequently in the real world. When I watch a Linux tutorial or screen cast on YouTube, odds are I'll see the Linux Mint logo in the toolbar. When I see someone using Linux at the coffee shop, it usually turns out to be Linux Mint. When I ask fellow Linux users which distro they use, the main answers are Ubuntu... and Linux Mint. All of that is anecdotal, but it still points to a simple truth. For a distro, that has seen little press lately, Linux Mint manages to remain popular with users.

There's a good reason for that popularity: Linux Mint just works. It isn't "changing the desktop computer paradigm," or "innovating" in "groundbreaking" ways. The team behind Mint is just building a desktop operating system that looks and functions a lot like every other desktop operating system you've used, which is to say you'll be immediately comfortable and stop thinking about your desktop and start using it to do actual work.

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Critical RCE Flaw in Linux APT Allows Remote Attackers to Hack Systems

January 22nd, 2019
Just in time… Some cybersecurity experts this week arguing over Twitter in favor of not using HTTPS and suggesting software developers to only rely on signature-based package verification, just because APT on Linux also does the same. Ironically, a security researcher just today revealed details of a new critical remote code execution flaw in the apt-get utility that can be exploited by a

Posted in APT, hacking news, linux, Linux APT, Linux hacking, Linux Vulnerability, man-in-the-middle attack, Software security, Vulnerability | Comments (0)

36-Year-Old SCP Clients’ Implementation Flaws Discovered

January 15th, 2019
A set of 36-year-old vulnerabilities has been uncovered in the Secure Copy Protocol (SCP) implementation of many client applications that can be exploited by malicious servers to overwrite arbitrary files in the SCP client target directory unauthorizedly. Session Control Protocol (SCP), also known as secure copy, is a network protocol that allows users to securely transfer files between a

Posted in file transfer protocol, linux, OpenSSH, Remote Copy Protocol, SCP Client, SCP Protocol, Secure Copy Protocol, ssh hacking, ssh security | Comments (0)

IBM Buys “Red Hat” Open-Source Software Company for $34 Billion

October 29th, 2018
It's been quite a year for the open source platforms. Earlier this year, Microsoft acquired popular code repository hosting service GitHub for $7.5 billion, and now IBM has just announced the biggest open-source business deal ever. IBM today confirmed that it would be acquiring open source Linux firm Red Hat for $190 per share in cash, working out to a total value of approximately $34

Posted in cloud computer, Cloud computing, IBM, linux, Linux server, Red Hat, red hat linux, redhat linux, tech acquisition, Technology News | Comments (0)