Archive for the ‘chrome’ Category

macOS Mojave’s dark mode is coming to Google Chrome

December 11th, 2018
Google Chrome in macOS Mojave.

Enlarge / Google Chrome in macOS Mojave. (credit: Samuel Axon)

Apple added dark mode to macOS with its Mojave software update on September. Since then, third-party apps have been adding dark themes to go along with it, but there have been a handful of notable outliers, like Slack and Google Chrome. We've now learned that the latter of those will get a formal dark mode in an upcoming release, likely Chrome 73.

As noted on Reddit and reported by MacRumors, a code change was submitted to Chromium on December 5 that lays the groundwork for the future public release. Here are the notes on the change from the Chromium issue page:

Mac: Change dark mode optout logic and respond to system changes

This change hooks up the "DarkMode" feature, allowing for three states
in Mojave:
- --force-dark-mode for dark appearance unconditionally
- --enable-feature=DarkMode to track system dark mode status
- No flags/default state is light appearance unconditionally

Since we build with an SDK < 10.14, we still need the Info.plist
key, but it now must be false.

Some related changes:
- Make Omnibox tint respond to OnNativeThemeChanged
- React immediately to changes in high-contrast mode setting

Chromium is the first stop for changes to Chrome, with more steps along the way like the beta release, before the changes finally make it to the public release. Even in Chromium, the feature requires digging into code to activate, so this is early along. But dark mode is clearly on the way.

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Posted in apple, browser, chrome, dark mode, google, MacOS, macOS Mojave, Tech | Comments (0)

Post-mortem: Tying Edge to Windows 10 was a fatal error

December 6th, 2018
Post-mortem: Tying Edge to Windows 10 was a fatal error

Enlarge (credit: @AndreTelevise)

As reported earlier this week, Microsoft is going to use Google's Blink rendering engine and V8 JavaScript engine in its Edge browser, largely ending development of its own EdgeHTML rendering engine and Chakra JavaScript engine. This means that Microsoft will be using code from—and making contributions to—the Chromium open source project.

The company's browser will still be named Edge and should retain the current look and feel. The decision to switch was motivated primarily by compatibility problems: Web developers increasingly test their pages exclusively in Chrome, which has put Edge at a significant disadvantage. Microsoft's engineers have found that problematic pages could often be made Edge compatible with only very minor alterations, but because Web devs aren't using Edge at all, they don't even know that they need to change anything.

The story is, however, a little more complex. The initial version of Edge that shipped with the first version of Windows 10 was rudimentary, to say the least. It was the bare bones of a browser, but with extremely limited capabilities around things like tab management and password management, no extension model, and generally lacking in the creature comforts that represent the difference between a bare rendering engine and an actual usable browser. It also had stability issues; crashes and hangs were not uncommon.

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Posted in Blink, chrome, Chromium, development, EDGE, google, JavaScript, microsoft, Open Source, Tech, WebKit | Comments (0)

Report: Microsoft is scrapping Edge, switching to just another Chrome clone

December 4th, 2018
Report: Microsoft is scrapping Edge, switching to just another Chrome clone

Enlarge (credit: Getty / Aurich)

Windows Central reports that Microsoft is planning to replace its Edge browser, which uses Microsoft's own EdgeHTML rendering engine and Chakra JavaScript engine, with a new browser built on Chromium, the open source counterpart to Google's Chrome. The new browser has the codename Anaheim.

The report is short on details. The easiest thing for Microsoft to do would be to use Chromium's code wholesale—the Blink rendering engine, the V8 JavaScript engine, and the Chrome user interface with the Google Account parts omitted—to produce something that looks, works, and feels almost identical to Chrome. Alternatively, Redmond could use Blink and V8 but wrap them in Edge's user interface (or some derivative thereof), to retain its own appearance. It might even be possible to do something weird, such as use Blink with the Chakra JavaScript engine. We'll have to wait and see.

Since its launch with Windows 10, Edge has failed to gain much market share. The first iterations of Edge were extremely barebones, offering little more than a basic tabbed browser—no extensions, little control over behavior. Early releases of Edge were also not as stable as one might have liked, making the browser hard to recommend. Three years later on and Edge is greatly—but unevenly—improved. The browser engine's stability seems to be much better than it was, and performance and compatibility remain solid (though with the exception of a few corner cases, these were never a real concern).

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Posted in browsers, chrome, EDGE, microsoft, standards, Tech, Web, Windows | Comments (0)

Chrome 71 will block any and all ads on sites with “abusive experiences”

November 5th, 2018
Chrome 71 will block any and all ads on sites with “abusive experiences”

Enlarge (credit: Isaac Bowen / Flickr)

Google is promising to punish sites that offer what the company calls "abusive experiences." Chrome 71, due for release in December, will blacklist sites that are repeat offenders and suppress all advertising on those sites.

The behaviors deemed abusive cover a range of user-hostile things, such as ads that masquerade as system error messages, ads with fake close boxes that actually activate an ad when clicked, phishing, and malware. In general, if an ad is particularly misleading, destructive, or intrusive, it runs the risk of being deemed abusive.

Chrome already takes some actions against certain undesirable website behaviors; it tries to block popups, it limits autoplay of video, and it blocks certain kinds of redirection. These measures have been insufficient to prevent misleading or dangerous ads, hence Google taking further steps to banish them from the Web.

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Posted in Advertising, chrome, Chromium, development, google, Open Source, Tech, the web | Comments (0)

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla come together to end TLS 1.0

October 16th, 2018
A green exterior door is sealed with a padlock.

Enlarge (credit: Indigo girl / Flickr)

Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla have announced a unified plan to deprecate the use of TLS 1.0 and 1.1 early in 2020.

TLS (Transport Layer Security) is used to secure connections on the Web. TLS is essential to the Web, providing the ability to form connections that are confidential, authenticated, and tamper-proof. This has made it a big focus of security research, and over the years, a number of bugs that had significant security implications have been found in the protocol. Revisions have been published to address these flaws.

The original TLS 1.0, heavily based on Netscape's SSL 3.0, was first published in January 1999. TLS 1.1 arrived in 2006, while TLS 1.2, in 2008, added new capabilities and fixed these security flaws. Irreparable security flaws in SSL 3.0 saw support for that protocol come to an end in 2014; the browser vendors now want to make a similar change for TLS 1.0 and 1.1.

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Posted in apple, browsers, chrome, EDGE, Firefox, google, microsoft, Mozilla, Safari, security, standards, Tech, TLS | Comments (0)

An ancient Chrome tab trick just blew my mind

August 15th, 2017

If your browser is a catastrophe of tabs as mine is—I currently have six Chrome windows across three monitors with more than 100 tabs open, because tabs are the new bookmarks—then this thing I just discovered may be life-changing. (Though it’s certainly not new.)

We all know that you can tear a tab off the tab bar to drag it into a new window (or drag it into a different tab bar to move it from window to window). What if I told you that you can use the standard selection modifiers—ctrl-click for multiple non-contiguous tabs, shift-click for multiple contiguous tabs—to tear off entire groups of related tabs in a single action?

Because believe it or not, you can.

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Posted in browsers, chrome, Tech, user interface | Comments (0)

Chrome Flaw Allows Sites to Secretly Record Audio/Video Without Indication

May 30th, 2017

What if your laptop is listening to everything that is being said during your phone calls or other people near your laptop and even recording video of your surrounding without your knowledge?

Sounds really scary! Isn’t it? But this scenario is not only possible but is hell easy to accomplish.

A UX design flaw in the Google’s Chrome browser could allow malicious websites to record audio or

Posted in chrome, Google Chrome, hacking news, Peer-to-Peer, web browser, webcam, webcam hacking, webcam hijacking, WebRTC Protocol | Comments (0)

Browser AutoFill Feature Can Leak Your Personal Information to Hackers

January 11th, 2017

Just like most of you, I too really hate filling out web forms, especially on mobile devices.

To help make this whole process faster, Google Chrome and other major browsers offer “Autofill” feature that automatically fills out web form based on data you have previously entered in similar fields.

However, it turns out that an attacker can use this autofill feature against you and trick you

Posted in browser auto-complete, browser autofill, browser hacking, chrome, Firefox, hacking browser, hacking news, hacking web browser, phishing attack | Comments (0)

The Chrome extension that “Firesheeps” you by choice

November 28th, 2016

This Chrome extension shares your session tokens instead of your passwords – but that’s still a risky idea and we suggest you avoid it.

Posted in AccessURL, chrome, data loss, firesheep | Comments (0)

Google Fixes Four Critical Vulnerabilities in Latest Chrome Build

March 25th, 2016

Google pushed out the latest version of Chrome Thursday afternoon, fixing five issues, four of them critical.

Posted in browser, Browser vulnerabilities, chrome, Google Chrome, PWN2OWN, vulnerabilities, Web Security | Comments (0)