Archive for the ‘Cooking’ Category

June postscript: 5 unusual things you can make in an Internet-connected oven

December 31st, 2018
Baked churros

Enlarge / The air-fried "churros" were delicious, but they tasted nothing at all like churros. (credit: Megan Geuss)

Earlier this month, Ars reviewed the June Oven, an Internet-connected, seven-in-one device that pushes the boundaries of the traditional toaster oven. Overall, I felt pretty positive about the June, especially the internal camera that allows you to watch your food cook (and share that view with others if you so desire).

But I mostly tested more traditional foods in the oven. After all, the best way to tell if a new toaster oven is any good is to see if it makes your best recipes more deliciously/reliably than your old toaster oven. I tried out some new things, of course: I hardboiled eggs (good!), baked bacon (bad!), and dehydrated kale chips (yummy but energy intensive!).

Before I send the June Oven back to its maker (in a box, with postage, not in a violent way of course) I wanted to test out five of the more unusual recipes that I found in June's app cookbook. The cookbook that's included in the June app is surprisingly well-populated with recipes specifically tailored to this IoT toaster oven, including a number of recipes that you'd never think to use a toaster oven for.

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Posted in Biz & IT, Cooking, IoT, June, kitchen tech, Tech | Comments (0)

Review: The June oven made me want a camera in every cooking device

December 22nd, 2018
June oven from the front.

Enlarge (credit: June Oven)

When my husband and I received a flashy, $250 Breville toaster oven for our wedding in 2014, we couldn't believe how awesome it was. It revolutionized the two-person meal in our household. We were freed from using the geriatric, unreliable oven that came with our apartment, and cookies, pizzas, and baked chicken dishes were now heated all the way through.

The best feature was the timer; you could pop a banana bread in there, set it for 40 minutes, and go walk the dog knowing that, when the 40 minutes ended, the Breville would shut off, and your food would slowly stop cooking. The Breville also broiled and roasted, too, so I could char peppers in the summer for salsa. Even four years after buying it, I've maintained that it's the best toaster oven out there.

Enter the June Oven. Ars heard about this Silicon-Valley marvel several months ago, and I was sent a review unit to test out. The appliance, which ships in February, is a $600 Internet-connected toaster oven that acts as a convection oven, toaster, air fryer, dehydrator, slow cooker, broiler, and warming drawer. (Although you'll need to buy June's Air Baskets separately to actually use the device as an air fryer or as a dehydrator, which will set you back another $50.) You can operate the June from the touch screen on the front or from the June app. Most importantly, there's a camera inside the oven, which totally changed the way I cook.

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Posted in Cooking, Features, Internet of things, June toaster oven, reviews, Tech | Comments (0)