Archive for the ‘Safeguard Data’ Category

Preparing for GDPR – Navigating a Perfect storm in Healthcare

June 28th, 2017

This is the fifth in a series of blog posts designed to help enterprise security and business executives prepare for GDPR throughout 2017

Recent ransomware incidents have put a spotlight firmly on the state of security within healthcare and there’s a perception that this industry is trailing others. Is that fair?

If we look at data loss prevention (DLP), which is particularly relevant with GDPR now less than a year away, then the 2016 Data Protection Benchmark Study from the Ponemon Institute, sponsored by McAfee, sheds some light. It puts healthcare “running about six months behind other industries” in terms of DLP deployment length and maturity.

And that’s important, not just because healthcare can be a matter of life and death, but because of the value of that particular data. Ponemon puts an average value of $355 on each patient record.

Meanwhile healthcare comes in second to only financial services in Verizon’s 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report, accounting for 15 per cent of all breaches.

So is this a perfect storm? On the one hand GDPR will mean significant penalties and a consistent framework to adhere to, while on the other hand the bad guys see an industry with valuable data that could be better protected.

Intel’s recent research, of 88 healthcare and life sciences organisations spanning nine countries, highlights a staggering range in readiness for attacks by ransomware, for example, judging by the number of relevant security capabilities these organisations have in place. It may seem strange to connect a discussion on GDPR and ransomware but it makes sense. What is ransomware if not a denial of service against data and how can you be sure that attackers can’t access the data they just encrypted? If you can’t stop the ransomware in the first place, there is a good chance you can’t stop the exfiltration in the next phase of the attack.

However, there are sensible steps the healthcare industry can take to become GDPR-ready. For these causes of data loss in healthcare, for example, Verizon’s report recommends specific actions:

Miscellaneous errors – which in 76 per cent of cases are embarrassingly pointed out by a customer – Have, and enforce, a formal procedure for disposing of anything that might contain sensitive data. And establish a four-eyes policy for publishing information.

Physical theft and loss – Encrypt wherever possible data at rest and establish handling procedures for printing out sensitive data.

Insider and privilege misuse – Implement limiting, logging and monitoring of use, and watch out for large data transfers and use of USB devices.

(Source: Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report.)

We would more broadly add that you can’t protect what you can’t detect. Visibility is key. As the Ponemon research put it, DLP solutions should cover data at rest, in processing and in motion, on the corporate network, endpoints and clouds. They form the basis of a good data security programme. Adequate staffing is also important and while automation and machine learning will help, they cannot replace staff entirely.

Some final guidance: Organisations can protect their sensitive data and be more likely to be GDPR-ready by taking these five critical steps:

  • Conduct an Impact and Readiness assessment
  • Review current data security programme to ensure you can prevent accidental and malicious data theft attempts
  • Assess application and DevOps security controls and procedures
  • Review your use of cloud infrastructure and software-as-a-service to minimise exposure to data loss
  • Develop specific data breach detection and response capability in the SOC

The post Preparing for GDPR – Navigating a Perfect storm in Healthcare appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in GDPR, healthcare, Safeguard Data, safeguard vital data | Comments (0)

Data breaches impact nearly half of IoT organizations

June 20th, 2017

Nearly half of U.S.-based companies using an Internet of Things network have been hit by a recent security breach, according to new survey data released by strategy consulting firm Altman Vilandrie & Company.

The April 2017 survey of 397 IT executives across 19 industries showed that 48 percent of organizations have experienced at least one IoT security breach. It revealed the significant financial exposure of weak IoT security for companies of all sizes.

Nearly half of the businesses with annual revenues above $2 billion estimated the potential cost of one IoT breach at more than $20 million.

“While traditional cyber security has grabbed the nation’s attention, IoT security has been somewhat under the radar, even for some companies that have a lot to lose through a breach,” said Stefan Bewley, director of Altman Vilandrie and author of the study.

“IoT attacks expose companies to the loss of data and services and can render connected devices dangerous to customers, employees and the public at large,” Bewley said. “The potential vulnerabilities for firms of all sizes will continue to grow as more devices become Internet dependent.”

The study showed that preparedness helps. Companies that have not experienced a security incursion have invested 65 percent more on IoT security than those who have been breached. Other key findings: 68 percent of respondents think about IoT security as a distinct category, yet only 43 percent have a standalone budget.

 

This article was written by Bob Violino from Information Management and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

The post Data breaches impact nearly half of IoT organizations appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Health providers need new security focus to protect patient data

June 13th, 2017

Incidents of cyber attacks against medical devices are inevitable, and healthcare providers are not prepared for the eventuality. In fact, in general, healthcare organizations are focusing all their efforts of protecting the wrong thing.

Keeping patients safe should dictate providers’ security efforts, but healthcare organizations are more likely to take steps that protect data so they can meet HIPAA requirements, said presenters last week at a security session at the annual meeting of the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine.

“Threats to patients and patients’ health are becoming more real,” says James Whitfill, MD, chief medical officer for Innovation Care Partners, a provider organization in Arizona.

The recent WannaCry ransomware attack helped to show the vulnerability of radiology equipment and other devices, Whitfill says. The attack encrypted Bayer MedRad devices at two U.S. healthcare organizations; the devices are power injector systems that monitor contrast agents that improve the quality of imaging scans.

“As providers, we should be concerned with actual patient health, not just protected health information (PHI),” Whitfill says. “We need to be making a shift from not worrying about policies and procedures to when our patients might be targeted by potentially harmful events.”

Research already has show that insulin pumps and infusion devices could be compromised, but cyber attackers might be able to exploit systems that influence patient care, such as computerized provider order entry and pharmacy systems. “What happens if someone gets into those systems that destroys inventory, changes records of patients’ allergies?” Whitfill says. “Or with surgical systems, what if attack damages equipment? There are a lot of potential threats here that could cause harm or death to patients.”

Provider security efforts need to take a fresh look at what attackers are looking to achieve, says Ted Harrington, executive partner for Independent Security Evaluators, a research firm that has taken an intensive look at security practices in healthcare.

“We look at things from the perspective of the adversary,” Harrington says. “A lot of security in healthcare is focused on compliance. WannaCry demonstrated that there are some real security issues in healthcare and other industries as well. Ransomware is not just a data issue – it does inhibit the ability to access data, but it is fundamentally a patient care issue.”

Harrington believes healthcare organizations need to refocus security efforts on protecting patient health, evolving away from a pure focus on protecting data that helps them to comply with HIPAA statutes.

“Protecting patient data along is insufficient to protect patient health,” he says. “For example, if you could attack something that could influence the way a physician behaves (such as information systems), that could compromise patient health. Some information systems are well protected, but there are so many different ways that someone could work his way through these layers of defense without even touching the things that are well protected.”

 

This article was written by Fred Bazzoli from Information Management and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

The post Health providers need new security focus to protect patient data appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le quatrième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

L’une des exigences fondamentales du nouveau règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD) est la notification des violations de données. Bien entendu, pour pouvoir signaler une violation de données, encore faut-il pouvoir la détecter, ce qui n’est pas toujours chose aisée.

Une étude de McAfee Labs a révélé que plus de 53 % des incidents sont détectés par un tiers. De plus, selon une enquête sur la réponse aux incidents réalisée par le SANS Institute en 2016, seuls 16 % environ des centres des opérations de sécurité (SOC) étaient considérés comme matures.

D’après ma propre expérience, nombre de ces centres se consacrent essentiellement à la traque des logiciels malveillants et s’intéressent très peu aux menaces internes ou à l’exfiltration de données. Ce qui nous amène à d’autres statistiques plus alarmantes encore. Selon une étude de 2016 du Ponemon Institute, seuls 24 % des entreprises sont capables d’identifier en moins de 24 heures les accès non autorisés à leurs systèmes critiques.

Tout cela me porte à croire que la plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité ne sont pas prêts pour la conformité au RGDP.

Voici donc quelques mesures que je les encourage à prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation.

 

Comprendre la transition

La première étape consiste à analyser la situation actuelle de votre entreprise et à élaborer un plan d’évolution. Pour vous aider à évaluer les capacités de vos opérations de sécurité en matière de détection des violations de données et de réponse à ces incidents, je vous propose un modèle simple en trois étapes, illustré ci-dessous.

 

D’après mon expérience, la plupart des clients se situent entre les niveaux 1 et 2. Toutefois, ils sont toujours plus nombreux à envisager l’adoption de technologies avancées, comme l’analyse du comportement des utilisateurs, pour mieux détecter les attaques avancées, commises tant en interne que depuis l’extérieur de l’entreprise. Je reviendrai sur les fonctions d’analyse plus tard.

 

Obtenir les données adaptées à la tâche

Sans une visibilité parfaite sur les activités des utilisateurs et sur les données, la détection des violations de données, ou même l’analyse des activités suspectes, est pratiquement impossible. La plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité connaissent bien les sources de données utilisées pour effectuer des recherches sur les incidents impliquant des logiciels malveillants. Des informations de cyberveille sont fréquemment collectées pour détecter les ordinateurs compromis et mener l’enquête. Il s’agit entre autres des indicateurs de compromission signalant la présence de logiciels malveillants, des journaux de trafic des pare-feux et des journaux des antivirus déployés au niveau des terminaux.

L’identification des comportements utilisateur non autorisés et la détection de l’exfiltration de données exigent cependant un tout autre niveau de visibilité. Songez à ajouter les sources de données suivantes à votre solution SIEM et à d’autres plates-formes d’agrégation des données :

 

Prévention des fuites de données (DLP) : Les capteurs DLP au niveau des terminaux et du réseau fournissent des informations potentiellement significatives sur les fuites de données accidentelles ou de simples tentatives de vol de données. Ces informations sont conservées dans des journaux essentiels pour l’investigation d’une compromission signalée et l’identification proactive d’un incident.

 

Identification et gestion des accès : Les données issues des systèmes de gestion des accès et des privilèges sont nécessaires pour identifier ou analyser les tentatives d’accès non autorisé aux systèmes critiques.

 

Surveillance de l’activité des bases de données : Il est fréquent que l’on néglige les bases de données en tant que source de données essentielle pour la détection et la réponse aux incidents. Or, elles contiennent les informations qui permettent de déceler très tôt une violation de données. Il est donc utile de collecter les journaux de bases de données, mais ils doivent absolument être complétés par les renseignements issus de capteurs spécialisés afin d’obtenir d’autres angles de visibilité.

Fonctions analytiques pour des renseignements pertinents

Quelles sont les informations opérationnelles précises dont j’ai besoin pour identifier une violation de données et confirmer qu’elle s’est bien produite ? Tirer des conclusions pertinentes sur le plan opérationnel à partir des données collectées est le principal objectif des centres des opérations de sécurité et, bien souvent, le plus difficile à réaliser. De nombreuses entreprises veulent une plate-forme unique pour analyser les données, mais il est plus judicieux de déployer l’outil spécialement conçu pour la tâche.

Quelques-unes des technologies fondamentales ainsi que la principale fonction qu’elles assurent dans le cadre de l’analyse des violations de données sont décrites ci-dessous.

 

Gestion des événements et des informations de sécurité (SIEM) : Les plates-formes SIEM agrègent les données et fournissent les diagnostics nécessaires pour analyser et valider rapidement les incidents de sécurité. Pour les centres des opérations de sécurité, des fonctions qui simplifient les investigations en cas de violation de données sont indispensables pour faciliter la production de rapports. Il s’agit notamment de l’analyse croisée des comportements des utilisateurs ou de fonctions prenant en charge le cadre UCF (Unified Compliance Framework).

 

Analyse du comportement des utilisateurs et des entités (UEBA) : Les plates-formes UEBA rassemblent quant à elles des données à partir de solutions SIEM ou de sources de données d’événement brutes. Elles recourent à des techniques avancées d’apprentissage automatique pour fournir des indicateurs de menaces internes potentielles. Les centres des opérations de sécurité doivent privilégier une solution qui inclut différents modèles comportementaux, lesquels doivent être adaptés à la chaîne de frappe des menaces internes.

 

Analyse du comportement sur le réseau : Les plates-formes d’analyse du comportement sur le réseau remplissent une fonction similaire aux plates-formes UEBA, mais se focalisent sur les flux de trafic réseau. L’analyse avancée doit être optimisée pour détecter les tentatives d’exfiltration de données.

Ce ne sont là que quelques-unes des principales mesures que les responsables des SOC doivent prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation au RGPD.

Suivez mon blog Securing Tomorrow pour rester au fait du RGPD et des grands enjeux de la cybersécurité.

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, GDPR, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le quatrième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

L’une des exigences fondamentales du nouveau règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD) est la notification des violations de données. Bien entendu, pour pouvoir signaler une violation de données, encore faut-il pouvoir la détecter, ce qui n’est pas toujours chose aisée.

Une étude de McAfee Labs a révélé que plus de 53 % des incidents sont détectés par un tiers. De plus, selon une enquête sur la réponse aux incidents réalisée par le SANS Institute en 2016, seuls 16 % environ des centres des opérations de sécurité (SOC) étaient considérés comme matures.

D’après ma propre expérience, nombre de ces centres se consacrent essentiellement à la traque des logiciels malveillants et s’intéressent très peu aux menaces internes ou à l’exfiltration de données. Ce qui nous amène à d’autres statistiques plus alarmantes encore. Selon une étude de 2016 du Ponemon Institute, seuls 24 % des entreprises sont capables d’identifier en moins de 24 heures les accès non autorisés à leurs systèmes critiques.

Tout cela me porte à croire que la plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité ne sont pas prêts pour la conformité au RGDP.

Voici donc quelques mesures que je les encourage à prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation.

 

Comprendre la transition

La première étape consiste à analyser la situation actuelle de votre entreprise et à élaborer un plan d’évolution. Pour vous aider à évaluer les capacités de vos opérations de sécurité en matière de détection des violations de données et de réponse à ces incidents, je vous propose un modèle simple en trois étapes, illustré ci-dessous.

 

D’après mon expérience, la plupart des clients se situent entre les niveaux 1 et 2. Toutefois, ils sont toujours plus nombreux à envisager l’adoption de technologies avancées, comme l’analyse du comportement des utilisateurs, pour mieux détecter les attaques avancées, commises tant en interne que depuis l’extérieur de l’entreprise. Je reviendrai sur les fonctions d’analyse plus tard.

 

Obtenir les données adaptées à la tâche

Sans une visibilité parfaite sur les activités des utilisateurs et sur les données, la détection des violations de données, ou même l’analyse des activités suspectes, est pratiquement impossible. La plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité connaissent bien les sources de données utilisées pour effectuer des recherches sur les incidents impliquant des logiciels malveillants. Des informations de cyberveille sont fréquemment collectées pour détecter les ordinateurs compromis et mener l’enquête. Il s’agit entre autres des indicateurs de compromission signalant la présence de logiciels malveillants, des journaux de trafic des pare-feux et des journaux des antivirus déployés au niveau des terminaux.

L’identification des comportements utilisateur non autorisés et la détection de l’exfiltration de données exigent cependant un tout autre niveau de visibilité. Songez à ajouter les sources de données suivantes à votre solution SIEM et à d’autres plates-formes d’agrégation des données :

 

Prévention des fuites de données (DLP) : Les capteurs DLP au niveau des terminaux et du réseau fournissent des informations potentiellement significatives sur les fuites de données accidentelles ou de simples tentatives de vol de données. Ces informations sont conservées dans des journaux essentiels pour l’investigation d’une compromission signalée et l’identification proactive d’un incident.

 

Identification et gestion des accès : Les données issues des systèmes de gestion des accès et des privilèges sont nécessaires pour identifier ou analyser les tentatives d’accès non autorisé aux systèmes critiques.

 

Surveillance de l’activité des bases de données : Il est fréquent que l’on néglige les bases de données en tant que source de données essentielle pour la détection et la réponse aux incidents. Or, elles contiennent les informations qui permettent de déceler très tôt une violation de données. Il est donc utile de collecter les journaux de bases de données, mais ils doivent absolument être complétés par les renseignements issus de capteurs spécialisés afin d’obtenir d’autres angles de visibilité.

Fonctions analytiques pour des renseignements pertinents

Quelles sont les informations opérationnelles précises dont j’ai besoin pour identifier une violation de données et confirmer qu’elle s’est bien produite ? Tirer des conclusions pertinentes sur le plan opérationnel à partir des données collectées est le principal objectif des centres des opérations de sécurité et, bien souvent, le plus difficile à réaliser. De nombreuses entreprises veulent une plate-forme unique pour analyser les données, mais il est plus judicieux de déployer l’outil spécialement conçu pour la tâche.

Quelques-unes des technologies fondamentales ainsi que la principale fonction qu’elles assurent dans le cadre de l’analyse des violations de données sont décrites ci-dessous.

 

Gestion des événements et des informations de sécurité (SIEM) : Les plates-formes SIEM agrègent les données et fournissent les diagnostics nécessaires pour analyser et valider rapidement les incidents de sécurité. Pour les centres des opérations de sécurité, des fonctions qui simplifient les investigations en cas de violation de données sont indispensables pour faciliter la production de rapports. Il s’agit notamment de l’analyse croisée des comportements des utilisateurs ou de fonctions prenant en charge le cadre UCF (Unified Compliance Framework).

 

Analyse du comportement des utilisateurs et des entités (UEBA) : Les plates-formes UEBA rassemblent quant à elles des données à partir de solutions SIEM ou de sources de données d’événement brutes. Elles recourent à des techniques avancées d’apprentissage automatique pour fournir des indicateurs de menaces internes potentielles. Les centres des opérations de sécurité doivent privilégier une solution qui inclut différents modèles comportementaux, lesquels doivent être adaptés à la chaîne de frappe des menaces internes.

 

Analyse du comportement sur le réseau : Les plates-formes d’analyse du comportement sur le réseau remplissent une fonction similaire aux plates-formes UEBA, mais se focalisent sur les flux de trafic réseau. L’analyse avancée doit être optimisée pour détecter les tentatives d’exfiltration de données.

Ce ne sont là que quelques-unes des principales mesures que les responsables des SOC doivent prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation au RGPD.

Suivez mon blog Securing Tomorrow pour rester au fait du RGPD et des grands enjeux de la cybersécurité.

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, GDPR, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le quatrième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

L’une des exigences fondamentales du nouveau règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD) est la notification des violations de données. Bien entendu, pour pouvoir signaler une violation de données, encore faut-il pouvoir la détecter, ce qui n’est pas toujours chose aisée.

Une étude de McAfee Labs a révélé que plus de 53 % des incidents sont détectés par un tiers. De plus, selon une enquête sur la réponse aux incidents réalisée par le SANS Institute en 2016, seuls 16 % environ des centres des opérations de sécurité (SOC) étaient considérés comme matures.

D’après ma propre expérience, nombre de ces centres se consacrent essentiellement à la traque des logiciels malveillants et s’intéressent très peu aux menaces internes ou à l’exfiltration de données. Ce qui nous amène à d’autres statistiques plus alarmantes encore. Selon une étude de 2016 du Ponemon Institute, seuls 24 % des entreprises sont capables d’identifier en moins de 24 heures les accès non autorisés à leurs systèmes critiques.

Tout cela me porte à croire que la plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité ne sont pas prêts pour la conformité au RGDP.

Voici donc quelques mesures que je les encourage à prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation.

 

Comprendre la transition

La première étape consiste à analyser la situation actuelle de votre entreprise et à élaborer un plan d’évolution. Pour vous aider à évaluer les capacités de vos opérations de sécurité en matière de détection des violations de données et de réponse à ces incidents, je vous propose un modèle simple en trois étapes, illustré ci-dessous.

 

D’après mon expérience, la plupart des clients se situent entre les niveaux 1 et 2. Toutefois, ils sont toujours plus nombreux à envisager l’adoption de technologies avancées, comme l’analyse du comportement des utilisateurs, pour mieux détecter les attaques avancées, commises tant en interne que depuis l’extérieur de l’entreprise. Je reviendrai sur les fonctions d’analyse plus tard.

 

Obtenir les données adaptées à la tâche

Sans une visibilité parfaite sur les activités des utilisateurs et sur les données, la détection des violations de données, ou même l’analyse des activités suspectes, est pratiquement impossible. La plupart des centres des opérations de sécurité connaissent bien les sources de données utilisées pour effectuer des recherches sur les incidents impliquant des logiciels malveillants. Des informations de cyberveille sont fréquemment collectées pour détecter les ordinateurs compromis et mener l’enquête. Il s’agit entre autres des indicateurs de compromission signalant la présence de logiciels malveillants, des journaux de trafic des pare-feux et des journaux des antivirus déployés au niveau des terminaux.

L’identification des comportements utilisateur non autorisés et la détection de l’exfiltration de données exigent cependant un tout autre niveau de visibilité. Songez à ajouter les sources de données suivantes à votre solution SIEM et à d’autres plates-formes d’agrégation des données :

 

Prévention des fuites de données (DLP) : Les capteurs DLP au niveau des terminaux et du réseau fournissent des informations potentiellement significatives sur les fuites de données accidentelles ou de simples tentatives de vol de données. Ces informations sont conservées dans des journaux essentiels pour l’investigation d’une compromission signalée et l’identification proactive d’un incident.

 

Identification et gestion des accès : Les données issues des systèmes de gestion des accès et des privilèges sont nécessaires pour identifier ou analyser les tentatives d’accès non autorisé aux systèmes critiques.

 

Surveillance de l’activité des bases de données : Il est fréquent que l’on néglige les bases de données en tant que source de données essentielle pour la détection et la réponse aux incidents. Or, elles contiennent les informations qui permettent de déceler très tôt une violation de données. Il est donc utile de collecter les journaux de bases de données, mais ils doivent absolument être complétés par les renseignements issus de capteurs spécialisés afin d’obtenir d’autres angles de visibilité.

Fonctions analytiques pour des renseignements pertinents

Quelles sont les informations opérationnelles précises dont j’ai besoin pour identifier une violation de données et confirmer qu’elle s’est bien produite ? Tirer des conclusions pertinentes sur le plan opérationnel à partir des données collectées est le principal objectif des centres des opérations de sécurité et, bien souvent, le plus difficile à réaliser. De nombreuses entreprises veulent une plate-forme unique pour analyser les données, mais il est plus judicieux de déployer l’outil spécialement conçu pour la tâche.

Quelques-unes des technologies fondamentales ainsi que la principale fonction qu’elles assurent dans le cadre de l’analyse des violations de données sont décrites ci-dessous.

 

Gestion des événements et des informations de sécurité (SIEM) : Les plates-formes SIEM agrègent les données et fournissent les diagnostics nécessaires pour analyser et valider rapidement les incidents de sécurité. Pour les centres des opérations de sécurité, des fonctions qui simplifient les investigations en cas de violation de données sont indispensables pour faciliter la production de rapports. Il s’agit notamment de l’analyse croisée des comportements des utilisateurs ou de fonctions prenant en charge le cadre UCF (Unified Compliance Framework).

 

Analyse du comportement des utilisateurs et des entités (UEBA) : Les plates-formes UEBA rassemblent quant à elles des données à partir de solutions SIEM ou de sources de données d’événement brutes. Elles recourent à des techniques avancées d’apprentissage automatique pour fournir des indicateurs de menaces internes potentielles. Les centres des opérations de sécurité doivent privilégier une solution qui inclut différents modèles comportementaux, lesquels doivent être adaptés à la chaîne de frappe des menaces internes.

 

Analyse du comportement sur le réseau : Les plates-formes d’analyse du comportement sur le réseau remplissent une fonction similaire aux plates-formes UEBA, mais se focalisent sur les flux de trafic réseau. L’analyse avancée doit être optimisée pour détecter les tentatives d’exfiltration de données.

Ce ne sont là que quelques-unes des principales mesures que les responsables des SOC doivent prendre pour améliorer leur état de préparation au RGPD.

Suivez mon blog Securing Tomorrow pour rester au fait du RGPD et des grands enjeux de la cybersécurité.

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Quatrième partie : votre SOC appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, GDPR, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Troisième partie : principales questions à poser à votre fournisseur de services de cloud

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le troisième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

Votre entreprise compte transférer des applications vers le cloud ? Si oui, elle est loin d’être la seule… Mais avez-vous songé aux répercussions qu’aura le règlement général sur la protection des données (RGPD) de l’Union européenne sur ce projet ?

 

McAfee perçoit le RGPD comme une occasion à saisir de transformer la sécurité — la possibilité d’en finir avec une approche de la sécurité purement axée sur la conformité et de passer à une stratégie qui met l’accent sur la protection de la vie privée et la sécurité dès la conception.

 

Le nouveau règlement rompt avec les précédents paradigmes de la conformité et, plutôt que d’imposer les technologies de sécurité à mettre en œuvre, exige des entreprises qu’elles développent des capacités durables. Finies les longues listes de vérification… C’est le moment idéal de réexaminer l’intégralité de votre stratégie de sécurité et de protection des données pour renforcer sa résilience. Nous sommes convaincus que le RGPD contribuera à transformer la façon dont est perçue la sécurité informatique. Celle-ci devrait apparaître comme un vecteur de développement de l’entreprise et, surtout, comme essentielle pour l’adoption de services de cloud en toute sécurité.

 

Peu importe que vous migriez d’anciennes applications vers le cloud public, adoptiez une solution de stockage dans le cloud ou optiez pour des applications d’entreprise fournies sous forme de services de cloud facturés à l’utilisation telles qu’Office 365. Vous devez réfléchir à l’impact qu’aura le RGPD et profiter de l’occasion pour étendre votre stratégie de sécurité pour le cloud.

 

McAfee souhaite que votre entreprise ouvre sans crainte ses portes au cloud. Pour vous y aider, voici quelques questions et points importants à garder à l’esprit lorsque vous vous entretiendrez avec votre fournisseur de services de cloud. Vous pourrez ainsi aborder la question de la préparation au RGPD et de la sécurité en général en connaissance de cause :

 

Votre fournisseur de services de cloud dispose-t-il d’une politique en matière de protection de la vie privée ? La mise en place de politiques de sécurité fiables et transparentes constitue la première étape. Bien souvent, le RGPD exige la désignation d’un délégué à la protection des données chargé de superviser le programme. Demandez également à discuter avec le délégué à la protection des données de votre fournisseur de services de cloud.

 

Comment utilisez-vous les données collectées ?

Les fournisseurs sont tenus de vous renseigner sur leurs méthodes d’utilisation (le cas échéant) des données collectées par leurs services, ainsi que sur les mesures prises pour protéger ces données. Bien souvent, les données collectées sont employées dans le cadre d’analyses ou à d’autres fins légitimes. Ces processus ne doivent cependant pas vous exposer à des risques supplémentaires.

 

Quels cadres, normes ou certifications de sécurité avez-vous choisi d’adopter ? Ou avec lesquels vos services sont-ils en conformité ?

Il existe plusieurs cadres de procédures et guides sectoriels qui fixent une série standardisée d’exigences et de contrôles pour la protection des services de cloud. Par exemple, FedRAMP est un programme complet qui vise à délivrer des autorisations aux services de cloud à l’intention du gouvernement des États-Unis. Il s’appuie cependant sur des publications du NIST et son adoption pourrait se généraliser. Au niveau international, il y a la norme ISO 27002, pour laquelle la CSA (Cloud Security Alliance) fournit des guides supplémentaires. Les fournisseurs de services de cloud doivent s’appuyer sur l’un des cadres disponibles pour évaluer et surveiller en continu leur niveau de maturité.

 

Êtes-vous capable de détecter une violation de données et d’assurer une réponse efficace ?

Statistiquement, plus de la moitié des violations de données sont détectées par un tiers. Le RGPD exige de l’entreprise victime d’un tel incident — la vôtre, en l’occurrence — qu’elle le signale à l’autorité de contrôle compétente au plus tard 72 heures après en avoir pris connaissance. Il est donc primordial d’être en mesure de déceler les violations de données potentielles et de disposer d’un plan de réponse éprouvé à l’aide de simulations. Demandez à votre fournisseur de services de cloud s’il peut assurer ces fonctions via un centre SOC ou CSIRT, dont il dispose éventuellement en interne ou auquel il a accès sous forme de service managé.

 

Où conservez-vous et traitez-vous les données collectées ?

L’endroit où résident les données est probablement la principale préoccupation lorsqu’il est question de services de cloud et de préparation au RGPD. Votre fournisseur de services de cloud dispose-t-il de centres de données dans l’Union européenne ou uniquement aux États-Unis ? Où stocke-t-il et traite-t-il ses données ? Sont-elles déplacées de l’UE vers les États-Unis ? Ces quelques interrogations peuvent trouver réponse en mettant en œuvre des mesures adéquates de chiffrement des données au repos, de contrôle de l’accès et de gestion des clés.

 

Bien que la liste de questions ci-dessus ne soit pas exhaustive, elle résume très bien les éléments à prendre en considération lors d’une discussion avec un fournisseur de services de cloud au sujet du RGPD. Espérons que cette lecture vous aidera à prendre des décisions plus avisées en tant qu’utilisateur de ces services et à vous engager sur la voie de la préparation au RGPD. Mais plus important encore, ces conseils vous permettront certainement de migrer vers le cloud en toute sécurité.

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Troisième partie : principales questions à poser à votre fournisseur de services de cloud appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Deuxième partie : instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le deuxième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

Les amendes… Sans doute le nouveau règlement général sur la protection des données de l’Union européenne est-il pour vous une source d’angoisse. Pourtant, vous devriez saisir l’occasion pour instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception.

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie ? Certes, la protection des données à caractère personnel et la cybersécurité sont au cœur de cette approche. Mais cela ne se résume pas aux données et aux technologies, loin de là. Ce n’est pas parce que le « D » de RGPD signifie « données » qu’il vous suffira de déployer une solution de prévention des fuites de données (DLP) pour que le tour soit joué. Même si l’approche est technologique (et comprenez-moi bien, je n’ai pas dit qu’adopter d’autres technologies DLP n’était pas une bonne chose), toute entreprise doit réfléchir à plusieurs éléments. Pensez aux processus métier et aux processus de détection des violations qu’elle affecte, au personnel chargé de faire fonctionner ces technologies et aux citoyens dont les données sont traitées — car ces personnes encourent des risques sur le plan personnel.

En ce qui concerne le personnel, vous devez déterminer l’impact qu’auront les technologies sur les divers rôles au sein de l’entreprise. Autrement dit, les utilisateurs normaux, ceux avec privilèges, les cadres dirigeants et les dirigeants.

Viennent ensuite les processus métier. Quels sont les flux de données ? Et sur quoi la collecte, la conservation et l’utilisation des données à caractère personnel ont-elles une incidence ? Vous devez prendre les mesures appropriées en termes de technologies et de procédures.

Je vous recommande donc d’adopter un cadre tel celui décrit ci-dessous. Tout d’abord, lorsque vous songez à votre stratégie de sécurité, pensez gouvernance, ressources humaines, processus et technologies. Ensuite, réfléchissez aux objectifs de sécurité à atteindre pour être préparé au RGPD, ainsi qu’aux solutions à mettre en œuvre.

 

Refonte de votre stratégie de sécurité

Il est clair que le nouveau règlement place la barre plus haut en termes de protection des données. Pour l’entreprise numérique hyperdynamique et interconnectée, se préparer aux nouvelles exigences de protection et de reddition de comptes ne sera pas simple. Cela nécessitera un remaniement global de différents aspects de la stratégie de sécurité : gouvernance, ressources humaines, processus et technologies.

  • Bien souvent, pour préparer l’entreprise à la mise en œuvre de ce nouveau règlement, il sera nécessaire de nommer un délégué à la protection des données ; celui-ci sera responsable de la conformité opérationnelle et de la communication avec les autorités de contrôle. De plus, au vu des montants potentiels des amendes en cas de non-respect du RGPD, celui-ci suscite l’intérêt des conseils d’administration. Il nécessitera sans doute la mise en place de nouvelles structures internes de rapport et le développement d’une véritable culture de respect de la conformité. Ces structures sont indispensables à la création d’un programme de protection des données performant sur le long terme.
  • Ressources humaines.Au sein de l’entreprise, la protection des données est la responsabilité de chacun, pas seulement de l’équipe de sécurité. Il est essentiel que tous les intervenants, depuis les cadres dirigeants jusqu’aux utilisateurs, en passant par les administrateurs et les développeurs, soient formés à la protection des données et prêts à remettre en question les mesures de « raccourci » qui seraient proposées. Et les intégrer à la solution, plutôt que voir en eux un problème, contribue grandement à l’instauration d’une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception.
  • Plusieurs processus métier et de sécurité fondamentaux devront être analysés pour vérifier leur adéquation et évaluer leurs fonctions. Pour cela, il faudra examiner de façon approfondie la collecte, les flux, le traitement, la conservation et la gestion des données pour bien comprendre la portée du problème. Les processus clés de protection des données incluent notamment la classification et la surveillance, ainsi que le développement d’applications et les tests de sécurité.
  • Il convient d’envisager un système de sécurité permettant non seulement de protéger les données au repos, en mouvement et en cours d’utilisation, mais aussi de détecter rapidement les violations tout en limitant le délai de réponse. Les entreprises doivent déterminer si la stratégie de sécurité en place s’appuie sur des technologies suffisamment à la pointe et efficaces pour faire face aux menaces récentes et garantir l’efficacité opérationnelle nécessaire afin d’éviter tout dépassement de budget.

 

Mesure de l’efficacité de la sécurité

Pour évaluer son degré de préparation au RGPD, une entreprise doit examiner son programme de sécurité. Toute entreprise engagée dans un projet de transformation numérique doit impérativement disposer d’un dispositif de cybersécurité capable d’assurer les niveaux de fonctions et de performances ci-dessous, qui constituent les principaux piliers d’une bonne préparation au RGPD. Vos solutions de sécurité doivent permettre aux composants techniques situés au niveau du terminal, du réseau, du cloud et du centre d’opérations de sécurité (SOC) de fonctionner ensemble comme un système orchestré. Ce dernier doit offrir les fonctions de prévention, de détection et de réponse nécessaires à la réalisation des objectifs d’efficacité attendus.

  • Neutralisation des menaces émergentes.Les infections par des logiciels malveillants (malware) et les exploits tirant parti des vulnérabilités des applications comptent parmi les principaux vecteurs d’attaques qui conduisent à l’exfiltration de données. Des mécanismes de défense contre les menaces avancées déployés sur les terminaux et le réseau permettent de réduire la surface d’attaque en renforçant la protection contre les logiciels malveillants connus et inconnus. Au niveau du SOC, tirez parti d’une cyberveille sur les menaces issue de plusieurs sources pour traquer de façon proactive les auteurs d’attaques.
  • Protection des données critiques.Pour être efficace, un programme de sécurité des données doit permettre, d’une part, de détecter et de bloquer les fuites de données accidentelles et les tentatives de vol de données de nature malveillante et, d’autre part, d’appliquer les mesures correctives requises. Des technologies de chiffrement et de prévention des fuites de données (DLP) sont essentielles pour empêcher que des données ne s’échappent de l’entreprise par accident. Au sein du SOC, une solution SIEM et l’analyse avancée du comportement des utilisateurs offrent la combinaison stratégique nécessaire à l’identification et à l’analyse des menaces internes.
  • Protection des environnements de cloud.Les applications SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) et hébergées dans le cloud posent des difficultés particulières pour la préparation au RGPD. Bien souvent cependant, des solutions de sécurité d’entreprise et dans le cloud distinctes sont utilisées, ce qui peut créer des failles au niveau de la visibilité et de la protection. Envisagez un système de sécurité unifié qui vous permette d’étendre facilement les fonctions de protection, de détection et de correction aux environnements de cloud.
  • Optimisation des opérations de sécurité. De nombreux centres des opérations de sécurité ne disposent pas des fonctions nécessaires pour détecter les violations de données et réagir efficacement. Étant donné qu’une des exigences primordiales de la préparation au RGPD prévoit que l’entreprise notifie toute violation de données dans les trois jours, il est essentiel de développer pour ces centres un plan tactique de gestion de ces incidents. Des technologies d’orchestration peuvent également aider à colmater les failles et à accélérer la réponse aux incidents.

 

Tel est le cadre que je recommande : commencer par les quatre dimensions de la stratégie de sécurité pour parvenir à une culture de la sécurité et de la protection de la vie privée dès la conception.

La deuxième partie de ce cadre décrit la manière dont la sécurité doit être abordée pour obtenir les résultats voulus en termes de préparation au RGPD.

Se préparer pour l’entrée en vigueur du RGPD doit inévitablement compter parmi les grandes priorités des responsables de la sécurité et des cadres dirigeants tout au long de l’année. Ils devront orienter leurs investissements en conséquence et mettre en œuvre de nouveaux programmes ou solutions qui permettront à leur entreprise d’être en phase avec ce nouvel environnement réglementaire renforcé.

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prêt ?

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Deuxième partie : instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Deuxième partie : instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception

June 13th, 2017

Cet article de blog est le deuxième d’une série dont le but est d’aider les dirigeants d’entreprise et les cadres responsables de la sécurité à se préparer au RGPD tout au long de l’année 2017.

 

Les amendes… Sans doute le nouveau règlement général sur la protection des données de l’Union européenne est-il pour vous une source d’angoisse. Pourtant, vous devriez saisir l’occasion pour instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception.

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie ? Certes, la protection des données à caractère personnel et la cybersécurité sont au cœur de cette approche. Mais cela ne se résume pas aux données et aux technologies, loin de là. Ce n’est pas parce que le « D » de RGPD signifie « données » qu’il vous suffira de déployer une solution de prévention des fuites de données (DLP) pour que le tour soit joué. Même si l’approche est technologique (et comprenez-moi bien, je n’ai pas dit qu’adopter d’autres technologies DLP n’était pas une bonne chose), toute entreprise doit réfléchir à plusieurs éléments. Pensez aux processus métier et aux processus de détection des violations qu’elle affecte, au personnel chargé de faire fonctionner ces technologies et aux citoyens dont les données sont traitées — car ces personnes encourent des risques sur le plan personnel.

En ce qui concerne le personnel, vous devez déterminer l’impact qu’auront les technologies sur les divers rôles au sein de l’entreprise. Autrement dit, les utilisateurs normaux, ceux avec privilèges, les cadres dirigeants et les dirigeants.

Viennent ensuite les processus métier. Quels sont les flux de données ? Et sur quoi la collecte, la conservation et l’utilisation des données à caractère personnel ont-elles une incidence ? Vous devez prendre les mesures appropriées en termes de technologies et de procédures.

Je vous recommande donc d’adopter un cadre tel celui décrit ci-dessous. Tout d’abord, lorsque vous songez à votre stratégie de sécurité, pensez gouvernance, ressources humaines, processus et technologies. Ensuite, réfléchissez aux objectifs de sécurité à atteindre pour être préparé au RGPD, ainsi qu’aux solutions à mettre en œuvre.

 

Refonte de votre stratégie de sécurité

Il est clair que le nouveau règlement place la barre plus haut en termes de protection des données. Pour l’entreprise numérique hyperdynamique et interconnectée, se préparer aux nouvelles exigences de protection et de reddition de comptes ne sera pas simple. Cela nécessitera un remaniement global de différents aspects de la stratégie de sécurité : gouvernance, ressources humaines, processus et technologies.

  • Bien souvent, pour préparer l’entreprise à la mise en œuvre de ce nouveau règlement, il sera nécessaire de nommer un délégué à la protection des données ; celui-ci sera responsable de la conformité opérationnelle et de la communication avec les autorités de contrôle. De plus, au vu des montants potentiels des amendes en cas de non-respect du RGPD, celui-ci suscite l’intérêt des conseils d’administration. Il nécessitera sans doute la mise en place de nouvelles structures internes de rapport et le développement d’une véritable culture de respect de la conformité. Ces structures sont indispensables à la création d’un programme de protection des données performant sur le long terme.
  • Ressources humaines.Au sein de l’entreprise, la protection des données est la responsabilité de chacun, pas seulement de l’équipe de sécurité. Il est essentiel que tous les intervenants, depuis les cadres dirigeants jusqu’aux utilisateurs, en passant par les administrateurs et les développeurs, soient formés à la protection des données et prêts à remettre en question les mesures de « raccourci » qui seraient proposées. Et les intégrer à la solution, plutôt que voir en eux un problème, contribue grandement à l’instauration d’une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception.
  • Plusieurs processus métier et de sécurité fondamentaux devront être analysés pour vérifier leur adéquation et évaluer leurs fonctions. Pour cela, il faudra examiner de façon approfondie la collecte, les flux, le traitement, la conservation et la gestion des données pour bien comprendre la portée du problème. Les processus clés de protection des données incluent notamment la classification et la surveillance, ainsi que le développement d’applications et les tests de sécurité.
  • Il convient d’envisager un système de sécurité permettant non seulement de protéger les données au repos, en mouvement et en cours d’utilisation, mais aussi de détecter rapidement les violations tout en limitant le délai de réponse. Les entreprises doivent déterminer si la stratégie de sécurité en place s’appuie sur des technologies suffisamment à la pointe et efficaces pour faire face aux menaces récentes et garantir l’efficacité opérationnelle nécessaire afin d’éviter tout dépassement de budget.

 

Mesure de l’efficacité de la sécurité

Pour évaluer son degré de préparation au RGPD, une entreprise doit examiner son programme de sécurité. Toute entreprise engagée dans un projet de transformation numérique doit impérativement disposer d’un dispositif de cybersécurité capable d’assurer les niveaux de fonctions et de performances ci-dessous, qui constituent les principaux piliers d’une bonne préparation au RGPD. Vos solutions de sécurité doivent permettre aux composants techniques situés au niveau du terminal, du réseau, du cloud et du centre d’opérations de sécurité (SOC) de fonctionner ensemble comme un système orchestré. Ce dernier doit offrir les fonctions de prévention, de détection et de réponse nécessaires à la réalisation des objectifs d’efficacité attendus.

  • Neutralisation des menaces émergentes.Les infections par des logiciels malveillants (malware) et les exploits tirant parti des vulnérabilités des applications comptent parmi les principaux vecteurs d’attaques qui conduisent à l’exfiltration de données. Des mécanismes de défense contre les menaces avancées déployés sur les terminaux et le réseau permettent de réduire la surface d’attaque en renforçant la protection contre les logiciels malveillants connus et inconnus. Au niveau du SOC, tirez parti d’une cyberveille sur les menaces issue de plusieurs sources pour traquer de façon proactive les auteurs d’attaques.
  • Protection des données critiques.Pour être efficace, un programme de sécurité des données doit permettre, d’une part, de détecter et de bloquer les fuites de données accidentelles et les tentatives de vol de données de nature malveillante et, d’autre part, d’appliquer les mesures correctives requises. Des technologies de chiffrement et de prévention des fuites de données (DLP) sont essentielles pour empêcher que des données ne s’échappent de l’entreprise par accident. Au sein du SOC, une solution SIEM et l’analyse avancée du comportement des utilisateurs offrent la combinaison stratégique nécessaire à l’identification et à l’analyse des menaces internes.
  • Protection des environnements de cloud.Les applications SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) et hébergées dans le cloud posent des difficultés particulières pour la préparation au RGPD. Bien souvent cependant, des solutions de sécurité d’entreprise et dans le cloud distinctes sont utilisées, ce qui peut créer des failles au niveau de la visibilité et de la protection. Envisagez un système de sécurité unifié qui vous permette d’étendre facilement les fonctions de protection, de détection et de correction aux environnements de cloud.
  • Optimisation des opérations de sécurité. De nombreux centres des opérations de sécurité ne disposent pas des fonctions nécessaires pour détecter les violations de données et réagir efficacement. Étant donné qu’une des exigences primordiales de la préparation au RGPD prévoit que l’entreprise notifie toute violation de données dans les trois jours, il est essentiel de développer pour ces centres un plan tactique de gestion de ces incidents. Des technologies d’orchestration peuvent également aider à colmater les failles et à accélérer la réponse aux incidents.

 

Tel est le cadre que je recommande : commencer par les quatre dimensions de la stratégie de sécurité pour parvenir à une culture de la sécurité et de la protection de la vie privée dès la conception.

La deuxième partie de ce cadre décrit la manière dont la sécurité doit être abordée pour obtenir les résultats voulus en termes de préparation au RGPD.

Se préparer pour l’entrée en vigueur du RGPD doit inévitablement compter parmi les grandes priorités des responsables de la sécurité et des cadres dirigeants tout au long de l’année. Ils devront orienter leurs investissements en conséquence et mettre en œuvre de nouveaux programmes ou solutions qui permettront à leur entreprise d’être en phase avec ce nouvel environnement réglementaire renforcé.

Dans quelle mesure êtes-vous prêt ?

The post Se préparer au RGPD en 2017 – Deuxième partie : instaurer une culture de la protection de la vie privée et de la sécurité dès la conception appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in Français, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)

Vorbereitung auf die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung 2017, Teil 4: Ihr Sicherheitskontrollzentrum (SOC)

June 12th, 2017

Dies ist der vierte Teil einer Reihe von Blog-Beiträgen, mit denen Sicherheitsverantwortliche und Führungskräfte in Unternehmen auf die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung (DSGVO) 2017 vorbereitet werden sollen.

 

Eine der wichtigsten Anforderungen gemäß der neuen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ist die Meldung von Kompromittierungen. Die Meldung einer Kompromittierung setzt natürlich die Fähigkeit voraus, eine Datenkompromittierung zu erkennen – und das ist nicht immer so einfach.

 

Untersuchungen von McAfee Labs haben gezeigt, dass mehr als 53 Prozent aller Vorfälle extern festgestellt werden. Zudem wurde bei einer SANS-Umfrage zur Reaktion auf Zwischenfälle im Jahr 2016 ermittelt, dass nur rund 16 Prozent der Sicherheitskontrollzentren (SOCs) als ausgereift erachtet wurden.

 

Aus eigener Erfahrung kann ich bestätigen, dass bei vielen Sicherheitsprozessen die Suche nach Malware-Bedrohungen im Vordergrund steht und es sehr wenige Anwendungsfälle für Insider-Bedrohungen oder Datenexfiltration gibt. Dies führt zu einer weiteren alarmierenden Statistik. In einem Bericht des Ponemon Institute von 2016 wurde festgestellt, dass nur 24 Prozent der Unternehmen in der Lage sind, einen unautorisierten Zugriff auf kritische Systeme in weniger als 24 Stunden zu erkennen.

 

All das veranlasst mich zu glauben, dass die meisten Sicherheitsprozesse nicht für die DSGVO bereit sind.

 

In diesem Beitrag habe ich einige wichtige Schritte für Sicherheitsprozesse aufgeführt, damit diese besser für die DSGVO gerüstet sind.

 

Die Entwicklung verstehen

 

Der erste Schritt zur Verbesserung besteht darin, den aktuellen Zustand zu verstehen und einen Plan zur Weiterentwicklung zu erstellen. Ich habe dieses einfache Dreistufenmodell entwickelt, um Unternehmen dabei zu unterstützen, ihre derzeitigen Sicherheitsprozesse zu bewerten – insbesondere im Hinblick auf die Erkennung von Datenkompromittierungen und die entsprechende Reaktion darauf.

The post Vorbereitung auf die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung 2017, Teil 4: Ihr Sicherheitskontrollzentrum (SOC) appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in GDPR, German, Safeguard Data | Comments (0)