Archive for the ‘McAfee Mobile Security’ Category

How Using A VPN Could Save Your Summer

May 23rd, 2017

As summer inches closer, I begin to daydream about all the trips I’ll get to take with my family. However, whether our days are spent on the beach or walking around cities we’ve never explored, they all start the same: long-haul flights, airports, and hotels. While the Wi-Fi at the airport may claim to be secure in the network name, public Wi-Fi networks lack encryption, which scrambles the data being sent over the network. Without encryption, cybercriminals can intercept shared information and gain access to personal passwords, financials, or identity information.

Traveling often means I’ll be surrounded by (and connecting to) unfamiliar Wi-Fi networks, which makes it especially important to have a smart security solution in place for all my devices. I rely on two different tools to keep my devices and my family’s devices safe while we’re on the road. One is a personal VPN, which keeps my connections safe, even if I need to log into an insecure Wi-Fi network. Personal VPNs encrypt online activities in both public and secure Wi-Fi networks, allowing users to surf the web safely and feel at peace knowing that sensitive information will be kept private.

If you tend to spend a lot of browsing or doing work from your device while traveling, make sure to download security apps that protect your devices directly. It’s nice to have that extra layer of security, as these apps analyze the applications already installed on my phone that use my private information, and secure my data accordingly. If you’re traveling to cities where pickpocketing is common (or if you’re simply forgetful), many of the security apps also offer anti-theft protection that allow the user to back up, lock, and wipe the device remotely.

My family likes to travel to many different places in one vacation, which makes these apps perfect – since we’re bouncing between hotels or vacation rentals, we’re often surrounded by unknown networks. If your device has made an unknown connection, you’re potentially at risk of downloading fishy viruses or malware through the network. I’ve found that it’s always smart to have extra protection if your devices have a higher chance of making an insecure connection.

While these tools are important to have, we’ve learned that technology can occasionally fail us. One of the most trustworthy ways to keep your devices safe while jet-setting around this summer is to understand what an insecure Wi-Fi connection looks like. If you can determine whether the connections around you are safe or not, it will potentially save you and your loved ones a massive headache down the road. Look out for these warning signs of an insecure network, and stay away from connecting if the network looks suspicious.

  • Check the Authenticity. If there is no WPA or WP2 password for protected access, the connection is open, or unencrypted. You can check the authenticity of the network by going into internet settings and looking to see if it’s protected with a WPA or WPA2, or if it says it’s “open.”
  • HTTP vs. HTTPS? Make sure that the web pages you visit are “HTTPS” encrypted whenever possible. Do this by looking at the beginning of the URL you are accessing – if the URL starts with “HTTP”, log out – particularly if you’re doing something sensitive.
  • Pay Attention to the Warning Signs. SSL and TLS warnings are the messages that pop up in your browser when you’re in danger of connecting to an insecure connection – and it’s likely that you’ve clicked through the notification without a second thought. Take a moment to think about what you’re agreeing to before moving past the notifications next time, because it could mean you’re putting your devices in danger.
  • Be Picky. Don’t set your device to automatically connect to Wi-Fi networks. Rather, make sure your laptops, tablets, or smartphones will “forget” certain networks when you disconnect, and that they’ll only reconnect when you choose to do so manually.

From the “secure Wi-Fi” you find at the airport and airplane, to whatever you can connect to in your hotel or vacation rental, it’s smart to have a secure solution if you plan to stay connected while traveling.  Know the warning signs of an insecure Wi-Fi connection and use a personal VPN and/or mobile security solution whenever possible to keep your data as protected as possible. Have a secure summer, and happy travels!

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

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Boo! The Spookiest Mobile Hacks of 2016

October 28th, 2016

Endless candy, an excuse to dress up as a character from your favorite comic book, and carving pumpkins with family… What’s not to love about Halloween? But witches, ghosts, and goblins aren’t the only things to fear this time of year. This Halloween, there’s a different kind of spooky story—mobile hacks. Mobile security threats are only growing, and new hacks are popping up faster than you can say “trick or treat.” Gather ‘round as we share four mobile hacks of 2016 that left us afraid to sleep with the lights off.

What’s Scarier Than Malware? Ghost Malware: Two years ago we uncovered a Trojan infecting Android devices running v. 5, and two years later it’s still on the loose, as many users haven’t transferred to updated systems that cleared the infection. We deemed the Trojan “Ghost Push,” as it dons several costumes in order to gain access to devices and their data. The malware starts its attack by posing as an application or plug-in, and finally disguises itself as Google Play, asking the user to disclose credit card information. Once Ghost Push makes its way into the mobile device, a second phishing overlay requests the victim’s phone number and date of birth. Ghost Push is one shady character that you don’t want to run into, so keep your device updated and avoid third-party app stores.

Hackers Are Total Brand Snobs: Brands used to pop up on soda cans and billboards, but today they’re everywhere you look, both offline and on. We ‘like’ their pages, ‘follow’ them, and download their apps, and cyber attackers are catching on. Brand-associated apps lined with malicious files are popping up left and right, with 248,701 malicious apps discovered in 2016. A big name is sometimes all of the validation we need to trust an app. Downloading a brand’s app can come in handy for special deals, new content, and customer service, but malicious apps are like the neighbors who hand out toothpaste on Halloween. Malware? No thanks! Skip this one and be extra cautious when you download a brand’s mobile app. Your phone will thank you.

Cat Videos and Malware: YouTube is everyone’s favorite distraction. What starts with Beyoncé’s latest music video quickly spirals into an endless black hole of entertainment. Cyber criminals love to take the fun out of everything, and YouTube was the latest victim when hidden voice commands were uncovered. That’s right, just having your phone nearby while you scroll through videos could be enough to infect your device. By embedding a manipulated voice saying “Ok Google,” criminals can alert your device and control it, all without your knowledge. Luckily, this hack hasn’t taken off just yet, but the possibility is present. To avoid this hack, consider turning off the always-on mode for your microphone.

Spooky Spyware Malware Hits Android: Earlier this year, SpyLocker, an Android banking malware, targeted customers of large banks in Australia, Turkey, and New Zealand. The mobile malware dressed up in one of the year’s trendiest costumes, a Flash Player, and stole login credentials from 20 different banking apps. Android devices both old and new were targeted, leaving call logs, incoming SMS messages, and other personal information in hackers’ hands. Does the thought of a criminal reading your text messages give you the heebie-jeebies? Us, too.

Did we leave you scared? Being cautious is the key to mobile security, and comprehensive software is the garlic that keeps hackers at bay. Try McAfee® Mobile Security, free for both Android and iOS, and lock down your device, your data, and your privacy.

Have a spooktacular Halloween!

Hungry for more mobile security tips? Be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Boo! The Spookiest Mobile Hacks of 2016 appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in app security, McAfee Mobile Security, mobile app, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

Boo! The Spookiest Mobile Hacks of 2016

October 25th, 2016

Endless candy, an excuse to dress up as a character from your favorite comic book, and carving pumpkins with family… What’s not to love about Halloween? But witches, ghosts, and goblins aren’t the only things to fear this time of year. This Halloween, there’s a different kind of spooky story—mobile hacks. Mobile security threats are only growing, and new hacks are popping up faster than you can say “trick or treat.” Gather ‘round as we share four mobile hacks of 2016 that left us afraid to sleep with the lights off.

What’s Scarier Than Malware? Ghost Malware: Two years ago we uncovered a Trojan infecting Android devices running v. 5, and two years later it’s still on the loose, as many users haven’t transferred to updated systems that cleared the infection. We deemed the Trojan “Ghost Push,” as it dons several costumes in order to gain access to devices and their data. The malware starts its attack by posing as an application or plug-in, and finally disguises itself as Google Play, asking the user to disclose credit card information. Once Ghost Push makes its way into the mobile device, a second phishing overlay requests the victim’s phone number and date of birth. Ghost Push is one shady character that you don’t want to run into, so keep your device updated and avoid third-party app stores.

Hackers Are Total Brand Snobs: Brands used to pop up on soda cans and billboards, but today they’re everywhere you look, both offline and on. We ‘like’ their pages, ‘follow’ them, and download their apps, and cyber attackers are catching on. Brand-associated apps lined with malicious files are popping up left and right, with 248,701 malicious apps discovered in 2016. A big name is sometimes all of the validation we need to trust an app. Downloading a brand’s app can come in handy for special deals, new content, and customer service, but malicious apps are like the neighbors who hand out toothpaste on Halloween. Malware? No thanks! Skip this one and be extra cautious when you download a brand’s mobile app. Your phone will thank you.

Cat Videos and Malware: YouTube is everyone’s favorite distraction. What starts with Beyoncé’s latest music video quickly spirals into an endless black hole of entertainment. Cyber criminals love to take the fun out of everything, and YouTube was the latest victim when hidden voice commands were uncovered. That’s right, just having your phone nearby while you scroll through videos could be enough to infect your device. By embedding a manipulated voice saying “Ok Google,” criminals can alert your device and control it, all without your knowledge. Luckily, this hack hasn’t taken off just yet, but the possibility is present. To avoid this hack, consider turning off the always-on mode for your microphone.

Spooky Spyware Malware Hits Android: Earlier this year, SpyLocker, an Android banking malware, targeted customers of large banks in Australia, Turkey, and New Zealand. The mobile malware dressed up in one of the year’s trendiest costumes, a Flash Player, and stole login credentials from 20 different banking apps. Android devices both old and new were targeted, leaving call logs, incoming SMS messages, and other personal information in hackers’ hands. Does the thought of a criminal reading your text messages give you the heebie-jeebies? Us, too.

Did we leave you scared? Being cautious is the key to mobile security, and comprehensive software is the garlic that keeps hackers at bay. Try McAfee® Mobile Security, free for both Android and iOS, and lock down your device, your data, and your privacy.

Have a spooktacular Halloween!

Hungry for more mobile security tips? Be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Boo! The Spookiest Mobile Hacks of 2016 appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in app security, consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, mobile app, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

Plug with Caution! How to Stop Hackers from Stealing More than Battery Power

September 13th, 2016

There’s nothing like that stressful moment when you look to your phone and see a red battery and a low digit—you need to find a charger, stat! Let your device die, and bid a temporary goodbye to your alarm, wallet, and notepad. With every message, refresh, and alert, our mobile devices consume tons of energy and are dying like never before. Desperate times call for desperate measures—but always use caution when charging.

Outside of the charger that came along with your device, there are mobile charging stations, knockoff accessories galore, and the ability to plug your gadget into another piece of technology. A low battery is a pain, and sometimes any option seems like a good option. We’re here to tell you that there’s no such thing as being too picky with how you recharge your mobile device. Carefree charging can leave your device, and your data, at risk.

If you’ve traveled lately, you’ve probably seen the tell-tale signs of a mobile charging station. Imagine 10 people sitting cross-legged on the floor, cords wrapping around them like webs. No, they’re not hunting for Pokémon; they’re claiming their fair share of free energy! These stations have been popping up at airports, libraries, cafes, and public transit hubs. Heck, hunting for a plug is almost as important as catching your flight these days! Spotting one is like stumbling upon an oasis; but before you plug in and rejoice, do you ever stop and wonder “is this safe?” Here’s why you should consider that whenever you connect a USB to your device, you’re swapping your data like hot cakes.

If there are no charging kiosks around, powering up via standard USB connector is probably your go-to move—simply plug your mobile device charger into a computer and you’re good to go! But this option isn’t without risks. Upon connecting, devices often go into transfer mode and third parties could extract data remotely; including device type, serial number, and chip ID. These details can provide hackers enough information to access your internal data.

Aside from stealing your data, criminals can load malicious programs (which reside on the computer) onto your device. You can hope that your device is safe, but you never know what could be lurking in the background, like malware downloaded via infected files. What’s even sketchier is using someone else’s computer to charge your device.

Next time you need a charge, keep these tips in mind:

  • Bring your own charger: The safest route is using the charger you know and love, plugged into a wall outlet. Portable chargers are also a handy alternative, and can be used when you’re on the go. Be sure to read seller reviews, and only go with a brand you trust.
  • Use a battery app: Dying batteries are a 21st-century problem, and like all 21st-century problems—there’s an app for that! Intel® Security Battery Optimizer, free for Android and tablets, is a complete device optimization app, which cleans up storage and extends battery life by stopping power-consuming apps in their tracks.
  • Turn your device off: Before you charge, put your device down for a nap. This extra precaution can help to prevent your gadget from exchanging data while charging. Turn it back on when you’ve got some juice, and you’re good to go!
  • Keep a close eye: Never leave your mobile device unattended while charging. Watch for overheating and theft. If your device feels unusually hot during a charge, unplug it immediately, as charger models with too much power supply can overheat your mobile device. Criminals know to lurk around charging stations, so don’t make the mistake of leaving your device left to fend for itself.

McAfee® Mobile Security, free for both Android and iOS, will alert you at the first sign of compromise, and protects your device and its data.

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Plug with Caution! How to Stop Hackers from Stealing More than Battery Power appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, mobile app, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

Plug with Caution! How to Stop Hackers from Stealing More than Battery Power

September 13th, 2016

There’s nothing like that stressful moment when you look to your phone and see a red battery and a low digit—you need to find a charger, stat! Let your device die, and bid a temporary goodbye to your alarm, wallet, and notepad. With every message, refresh, and alert, our mobile devices consume tons of energy and are dying like never before. Desperate times call for desperate measures—but always use caution when charging.

Outside of the charger that came along with your device, there are mobile charging stations, knockoff accessories galore, and the ability to plug your gadget into another piece of technology. A low battery is a pain, and sometimes any option seems like a good option. We’re here to tell you that there’s no such thing as being too picky with how you recharge your mobile device. Carefree charging can leave your device, and your data, at risk.

If you’ve traveled lately, you’ve probably seen the tell-tale signs of a mobile charging station. Imagine 10 people sitting cross-legged on the floor, cords wrapping around them like webs. No, they’re not hunting for Pokémon; they’re claiming their fair share of free energy! These stations have been popping up at airports, libraries, cafes, and public transit hubs. Heck, hunting for a plug is almost as important as catching your flight these days! Spotting one is like stumbling upon an oasis; but before you plug in and rejoice, do you ever stop and wonder “is this safe?” Here’s why you should consider that whenever you connect a USB to your device, you’re swapping your data like hot cakes.

If there are no charging kiosks around, powering up via standard USB connector is probably your go-to move—simply plug your mobile device charger into a computer and you’re good to go! But this option isn’t without risks. Upon connecting, devices often go into transfer mode and third parties could extract data remotely; including device type, serial number, and chip ID. These details can provide hackers enough information to access your internal data.

Aside from stealing your data, criminals can load malicious programs (which reside on the computer) onto your device. You can hope that your device is safe, but you never know what could be lurking in the background, like malware downloaded via infected files. What’s even sketchier is using someone else’s computer to charge your device.

Next time you need a charge, keep these tips in mind:

  • Bring your own charger: The safest route is using the charger you know and love, plugged into a wall outlet. Portable chargers are also a handy alternative, and can be used when you’re on the go. Be sure to read seller reviews, and only go with a brand you trust.
  • Use a battery app: Dying batteries are a 21st-century problem, and like all 21st-century problems—there’s an app for that! Intel® Security Battery Optimizer, free for Android and tablets, is a complete device optimization app, which cleans up storage and extends battery life by stopping power-consuming apps in their tracks.
  • Turn your device off: Before you charge, put your device down for a nap. This extra precaution can help to prevent your gadget from exchanging data while charging. Turn it back on when you’ve got some juice, and you’re good to go!
  • Keep a close eye: Never leave your mobile device unattended while charging. Watch for overheating and theft. If your device feels unusually hot during a charge, unplug it immediately, as charger models with too much power supply can overheat your mobile device. Criminals know to lurk around charging stations, so don’t make the mistake of leaving your device left to fend for itself.

McAfee® Mobile Security, free for both Android and iOS, will alert you at the first sign of compromise, and protects your device and its data.

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Plug with Caution! How to Stop Hackers from Stealing More than Battery Power appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, mobile app, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

The Four Mobile Security Threats You Need to Know About

August 30th, 2016

“Florals for Spring, groundbreaking.” There are few movie quotes that continue to resonate as much as the line delivered by Meryl Streep’s character in the modern classic “The Devil Wears Prada”. The line sparked memes galore, poked fun at the showy culture surrounding fashion, and mocked the pressure our society places on keeping up with cool. Cybercriminals are all about keeping up with trends—no, not ski masks and gloves—but hacking the latest tech trends.

One of hackers’ favorite accessories is one of ours, too: the mobile device. These handy gadgets are always by our sides and in our (last season’s) handbags, so it’s only natural that they are one of the biggest targets for attacks. Partner our reliance on these devices with the general lack of education around mobile security, and you’ve got a recipe for trouble. We hear about threats on the news and in our feeds, but as they continue to evolve, it’s hard to keep up.

Here’s our list of the four mobile security trends you need to know about this season:

  1. Trust No App Who doesn’t love apps? There’s an app that tells you exactly how far away the bus is, where your kids are, or how to translate a menu. If you’re like me, you probably have dozens of apps on your devices, some of which haven’t been touched in months or even years. When it comes to mobile apps, they’re not all our friends. Among the good guys are plenty of bad guys, waiting for you to hit ‘download’ so that they can launch onto your device and go wild, including stealing your personal information, conducting financial transactions, and loading viruses. Nobody likes any of those things, so keep your device safe! Be picky with your downloads, delete unused apps, and always read the security agreements.
  1. Watch Out for Bad Guys Remember when you were a kid and you’d lose your shoe (just one) or a textbook? Mom always came to the rescue to help save the day. Today, there’s something even scarier than losing your shoe—your mobile device is your wallet, alarm clock, and email all wrapped into one. Everyone dreads that moment when you check your pockets and bag, looking for your device and come up empty. Aside from the money you spent on your device, it’s your data that you really lose. Device theft is a growing trend, one used to make extra cash and even to gain access to personal information. To keep your device safe if it lands in the wrong hands, lock it with a PIN, and always, always, back up your data.
  1. Connect to Wi-Fi with Caution Restaurants have signs in their windows that say “Free Wi-Fi” and malls and hotels automatically prompt you to log on. As we become increasingly connected, easy-to-access Wi-Fi is almost a guarantee. As tempting as it can be to join a network named “Free, Fast Internet,” on your mobile device, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Connecting to an unsecured Wi-Fi network leaves your device vulnerable to hackers, and everything held within it. Places like airports and convention centers often have public Wi-Fi which can be secured—score! But for every secure network, a knock off created by hackers is sure to follow. There are many steps you can take to surf the public web without asking to get hacked, including paying for private access and double-checking security. Here are some helpful tips.
  1. Throw It in the Cloud Just a few short years ago, “clouds” were those big, fluffy objects floating in the sky. Today, the network of servers that we refer to as the cloud is everywhere and made up of everything. We rely on the cloud to store our data, backup our contacts (don’t wait until you drop your phone to do this), and communicate with coworkers. As we’ve become increasingly reliant on the cloud’s benefits, do you ever stop and wonder if there’s a guard keeping your information safe in the cloud? A recent Intel Security survey found that, of cloud storage providers, “some 40 percent are failing to protect files.” If this number makes you nervous, it should. We trust the cloud with our most private details, from personal to professional, and a strong defense is needed to keep that data, and your device, safe. To do so, only use cloud providers which you trust, read their privacy agreement, and think before you share.

Taking the precautions listed above can help to keep your device protected, but comprehensive mobile security takes some of the load off. McAfee® Mobile Security, free for both Android and iOS, helps to protect your device, your data, and your privacy.

Looking for more mobile security tips and trends? Be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post The Four Mobile Security Threats You Need to Know About appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, mobile app, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

Autorooting Malware Gives Hackers the Green Light into Your Device

August 2nd, 2016

It wasn’t that long ago when discovering new products, restaurants and everything in between came down to asking our circle of friends. Reviews and ratings were the stamp of approval to which our friends held the key. In 2016, we ask the internet, and now strangers tell us what they like (or don’t), and why we should too. Before downloading an app or finding a new hairdresser, we ask people we may know nothing about other than their username what they think.

Where am I going with this? Malware. Autorooting malware is a growing threat that cybercriminals launch on mobile devices in order to install unwanted apps. This exploit is used to drive revenue and boost ratings. If ratings are high for an app, other users are more likely to trust and download it. Rooting a device allows cybercriminals to perform operations that would otherwise require your permission. Autorooting can be a major threat — once a criminal has taken over your mobile device, they can open the door to all of their dangerous friends. It’s a shady app party, and your device is getting destroyed.

The latest bad guy to get caught is LevelDropper, a malicious app available in the Google Play Store that appeared to transform your phone into a level, in order to replace the physical one in your toolbox. Handy! Everyone who has ever struggled to hang up a picture — rejoice! Sadly, LevelDropper is just the next offender in the mobile threat world. Once downloaded, the app autoroots the device and quickly installs new apps, without user permission. As we’ve told you before, it’s important to always be picky when downloading apps. If you notice new apps that pop up right after downloading one from an app store, your device could have fallen victim to an autorooting malware attack.

LevelDropper isn’t the only app using autorooting to their benefit and your detriment — the trend is exploding. Malicious programs are offered in even the most trusted app stores, and the only way to stay clear is to use extreme caution.

Cybercriminals are always looking for new ways to trick you into downloading their apps, but there are ways to keep them at bay:

  • Always be cautious when downloading apps on your mobile device. Read the privacy policy, check out user reviews, and be sure you’re OK with providing access to everything it’s requesting.
  • Install comprehensive security. McAfee® Mobile Security is free for Android and iOS, and can help to protect your Android mobile device from not only autorooting malware (like LevelDropper), but all malware. We don’t discriminate, and will alert you if we sense an app to be malicious, all before you download.
  • So many new apps, so little time. A key to keeping your device healthy is only downloading apps that have a good reputation. The internet isn’t just a handy place to find your new favorite restaurant, it’s also a great place to do some digging. Search the app’s name and see the buzz.

If you do fall victim to autorooting malware, we recommend performing a factory reset of your mobile device. Cybercrimes are always evolving, and we will never stop having your back. Check back here to always stay in the know.

To keep up with the latest security threats, be sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Autorooting Malware Gives Hackers the Green Light into Your Device appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in app security, Autorooting device, consumer, LevelDropper, McAfee Mobile Security, Mobile Security | Comments (0)

World Password Day Came and Went – Did You Add MFA?

May 10th, 2016

Your family photos, your savings account, and maybe even your dating life are all hidden behind one thing: a password. A combination of letters and numbers protects your personal information from the hands of hackers.

Last Thursday, we filled your social media feeds with articles, videos and Tweets, hoping to raise password awareness on World #PasswordDay. This year, we focused on the importance of multi-factor authentication (MFA). Why stop with simply updating your password, when you can protect your data with another layer of security?

To make our point, we brought out the big dogs and teamed up with a hard hitter. If anyone can convince you to take some time to rethink your password strategy, it’s none other than the actress known for taking no punches, Betty White.

Did you catch her Password Pep Talk videos? Watch below to learn some valuable lessons, and have a nice chuckle too:

 

Our mobile phones are at the center of our lives (and usually in the palm of our hands). They may just seem like means for checking email on the go or to text a friend, but do us a favor and think of all the information stored on your phone. That’s a scary thought, when you consider hacking and even theft of mobile devices.

Stop worrying, and start preventing. Here are our top three password tips:

  • Lock it down twice. Multi-factor authentication requires more than username and password for entry. To gain access, MFA demands something you know, like a password, and something only you can provide, like a fingerprint or face scan. This information is specific to you, so only you can access the things meant for your eyes only.
  • Strong and long. Passwords should be at least 8 characters long. Longer passwords take longer to crack, it’s that simple. A strong password uses a combination of numbers, upper and lowercase letters, and symbols. Avoid birthdays, family names, and repeated characters. More tips.
  • Change of the seasons, change of the password. Passwords should be changed every three to six months. Using the same password for a long period of time gives hackers a better chance to crack the code. Set a reminder on your calendar to get creative and update all of your accounts with a new, secure password.

We can’t prevent data invasions from happening, but we can take steps to make gaining access to private information more difficult. Adding in additional security layers, especially on your mobile device, could be the key to keeping your private life private. So with all of the information thrown your way this World #PasswordDay, did you add a second layer of protection? Now is the time!

Think you’re a password pro? Take our Security IQ Quiz and find out just how savvy you are!

To stay up-to-date with the latest security threats year-round, make sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post World Password Day Came and Went – Did You Add MFA? appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in app security, consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, Mobile Security, password, password security | Comments (0)

Use an Airport App to Catch a Flight, Not a Bug

April 26th, 2016

Traveling is supposed to be a break from reality, but that doesn’t mean it’s a breeze. First your Uber driver is going below the speed limit, then you can’t remember if you packed your computer charger, oh, and is your flight on time? There’s a lot to keep track of when catching a flight, but as the saying goes, “there’s an app for that!”

Tech startups aren’t the only businesses jumping on the mobile app bandwagon. Airports are also building apps to make things easier for both travelers and employees. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport, one of the world’s busiest, has a suite of over 40 mobile applications. These apps update passengers on the status of their flight, help them find their gate (or a Starbucks), and even enable them to watch TV while flying high in the sky. The benefits of airport apps are obvious, but anytime you use a mobile app, your guard should be up.

Next time you use an airport app, follow these tips for catching your flight, and not a bug:

Pack Your Bags, and Your Apps, at Home

The availability of public Wi-Fi is usually a guarantee at airports, along with crying babies and tacky t-shirts, but be sure to download any travel apps while using your secure connection at home. This extra step is just another way to help protect your device from hackers. Connecting to an open public network is never recommended, but if you must, be sure to follow our tips for safe surfing.

So Many Apps, So Little Time

A quick search for “SFO” in an app store brings up too many apps to count. How will you ever choose? As airport apps are all the rage these days, there really is no right answer. There are apps that focus on security line times and travel guides, but use caution before downloading. Look over app ratings, description, and the company behind it. Downloading a shady app can open your phone to malware, so move with caution.

The Devil’s in the Details

A good rule of thumb for downloading any mobile app is to read the privacy policy first. If an app is asking for sensitive data, give it a close look and think twice before agreeing to the terms. A legitimate mobile app won’t request things like access to your network or contacts.

Cash Is So 2011

Who needs a computer anymore? Airport apps provide the option to purchase flights and even rent a car all through your smart phone. Always think twice before entering personal financial information on your mobile device, and never, ever do so while on free, public Wi-Fi. Remember that credit cards are usually more secure than debit, thanks to access limits and more sophisticated security measures. For an added layer of security on your mobile device, download McAfee® Mobile Security, available for both Android and iOS.

Summer will be here before we know it, and long-awaited trips will no longer be something to daydream about at work. Next time you find yourself running to catch a flight, be sure to use an airport app, and keep our safety tips in mind. For more tips on staying safe on mobile while away, check out our comprehensive guide!

To keep up with the latest security threats, make sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

lianne-caetano

The post Use an Airport App to Catch a Flight, Not a Bug appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in Airport Apps, consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, Mobile Security, Travel Security, wi-fi | Comments (0)

You Might Not Be a Celebrity, But You Could Still Get Hacked

April 12th, 2016

In 2016, there’s a ‘who’s who’ of A-list celebrities. No, it’s not who was invited to the Academy Awards or who has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Instead, this list exists online and in our memories. Celebrities get hacked and within minutes the news floods our feeds and fills the halls. Even the biggest names have been victims of invasion of privacy through data hacks. This type of personal invasion happens to the likes of Adele and Jennifer Lawrence, but not you, right? Think again. You might not have attended this year’s Oscars, but your private information and documents could still get hacked. Hacks can happen to anyone, and in this case, ignorance is not bliss.

Possibly the most notable celebrity hack happened in 2014, when almost 500 private documents leaked in a dark corner of the Internet. But as things go on the Web, the images from that hack spread like wildfire, and were available on dozens of sites within hours. How did this happen? Turns out even J-Law can’t hide from a high-level hack.

This celebrity document leak was done in large part through unprecedented access to personal cloud accounts. Millions store documents, data, and photos in cloud-based services, but this particular hack proved that security is never guaranteed. The cybercriminal behind this leak also used phishing emails to gain login information directly from the victims.

They say every cloud has a silver lining, and in this case, that silver lining is heightened awareness. Because of high profile hacks like this one, news outlets were handing out tips for staying safe like Halloween candy. Here are some of ours:

  • Trash Those Passwords. We know it can be tempting to reuse and recycle passwords. It’s just one more thing to remember, but using a lazy password technique is an open invitation to your data. Create different passwords for each service you use, and change them frequently. Trust us, it’s worth the extra effort.
  • Twice the Security, Twice the Peace of Mind. Single-factor authentication requires only a username and password, while two-factor authentication (2FA) protects your accounts with a second layer of security. There are a few types of 2FA authentication, such as an SMS text to your mobile phone, prompting you to confirm your login, or even a fingerprint scan. Using only one layer of protection makes it easier for hackers to gain access. The celebrity hacks could have been prevented if the victims utilized 2FA.
  • Get to Know Your Cloud Before Moving In. The cloud has some major benefits, but be sure you know what you’re in for when setting up a cloud-hosted data storage system. Always read the user agreement to better understand the details before your documents put down roots in the cloud. If your data is sensitive, consider avoiding public cloud storage. Of course, security is never 100% guaranteed, but virtual storage might not be the best place to upload all of your personal data.
  • Say No to Phishing. Phishing is a cybercriminal tactic that aims at accessing personal information directly from users by pretending to be a trustworthy person or business, and asking for personal information. Always be suspicious of emails from phone and Internet providers. Think before you click on links, emails, or suspicious search results.
  • Protect With McAfee® Mobile Security. Security software does the work for you when it comes to protecting your mobile device. Upon download, an immediate security and privacy scan starts, and keeps watch when downloads and other suspicious activity takes place on your device. McAfee® Mobile Security is free for both Android and iOS, and keeps your mobile devices safe through a variety of protections.

Your technology stores moments from every aspect of your life, so keeping it secure should be a top priority. Remember, you might not be a celeb, but you could still get hacked.

To keep up with the latest security threats, make sure to follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Pledge to take your password to the next level! World Password Day is almost here.

lianne-caetano

The post You Might Not Be a Celebrity, But You Could Still Get Hacked appeared first on McAfee.

Posted in celebrity hacks, Cloud security, consumer, McAfee Mobile Security, Mobile Security | Comments (0)