Archive for the ‘Windows 10’ Category

Windows 10 will make it easier to ¯‍∖‍_‍(‍ツ‍)‍_‍/‍¯ and ‍(‍╯‍°‍□‍°‍)‍╯‍︵‍ ‍┻‍━‍┻

December 20th, 2018
The new extended emoji picker.

Enlarge / The new extended emoji picker. (credit: Microsoft)

One of the more welcome additions to Windows 10 has been the emoji search panel, making it as easy to type emoji on a PC as it is on your phone. The latest Windows 10 insider build, 18305, is taking this a step further, including not just emoji but also kaomoji and symbols.

Kaomoji ("face characters") is, apparently, the name for those complicated faces made up of sequences of Japanese symbols. While some, such as shrugging ¯‍\‍_‍(‍ツ‍)‍_‍/‍¯, have become widespread (Slack's /shrug surely having at least some of the blame there), there is in fact a rich variety of faces that are used. So while sometimes you might be table flippingly mad (‍╯‍°‍益‍°‍)‍╯‍彡‍┻‍━‍┻ other times you might just want to flip the bird ┌‍∩‍┐‍(‍◣‍_‍◢‍)‍┌‍∩‍┐. If that's all a bit shocking you might be a little surprised (‍⊙‍_‍⊙‍) and perhaps you'll even run away ε‍=‍ε‍=‍┌‍(‍ ‍>‍_‍<‍)‍┘.

With Christmas and the New Year imminent, this is likely to be the last new build we see for a few weeks, so it's nice that it has an interesting new feature to explore. The new build also includes the first iterations of the Windows Sandbox feature announced earlier this week. Sandbox uses a combination of hypervisor and container technologies to provide a secure, isolated environment for running untrusted applications.

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Posted in Emoji, kaomoji, Tech, Unicode, Windows 10 | Comments (0)

Microsoft unveils Windows Sandbox: Run any app in a disposable virtual machine

December 19th, 2018
Microsoft unveils Windows Sandbox: Run any app in a disposable virtual machine

Enlarge (credit: F Delventhal)

A few months ago, Microsoft let slip a forthcoming Windows 10 feature that was, at the time, called InPrivate Desktop: a lightweight virtual machine for running untrusted applications in an isolated environment. That feature has now been officially announced with a new name, Windows Sandbox.

Windows 10 already uses virtual machines to increase isolation between certain components and protect the operating system. These VMs have been used in a few different ways. Since its initial release, for example, suitably configured systems have used a small virtual machine running alongside the main operating system to host portions of LSASS. LSASS is a critical Windows subsystem that, among other things, knows various secrets, such as password hashes, encryption keys, and Kerberos tickets. Here, the VM is used to protect LSASS from hacking tools such that even if the base operating system is compromised, these critical secrets might be kept safe.

In the other direction, Microsoft added the ability to run Edge tabs within a virtual machine to reduce the risk of compromise when visiting a hostile website. The goal here is the opposite of the LSASS virtual machine—it's designed to stop anything nasty from breaking out of the virtual machine and contaminating the main operating system, rather than preventing an already contaminated main operating system from breaking into the virtual machine.

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Posted in hyper-V, microsoft, sandboxing, Tech, virtual machines, Windows, Windows 10 | Comments (0)

The Windows 10 October 2018 Update is now fully available—for “advanced” users

December 18th, 2018
Who doesn't love some new Windows?

Enlarge / Who doesn't love some new Windows? (credit: Peter Bright / Flickr)

The Windows 10 October 2018 Update, version 1809, continues to limp out of the door. While the data-loss bug that saw its release entirely halted has been fixed, other blocking issues have restricted its rollout. It has so far only been available to those who manually check Windows Update for updates, and even there, Microsoft has restricted the speed at which it's distributed.

This particular speed bump has now been removed, and manual checking for updates is now unthrottled. That means a manual check for updates will kick off the update process so long as your system isn't actively blacklisted (and there are a few outstanding incompatibilities that mean it could be).

Microsoft is saying that this upgrade route is for "advanced" users. Everyone else should wait for the fully automatic deployment, which doesn't seem to have started yet. That'll have its own set of throttles and perhaps even new blacklists if further problems are detected. A number of the remaining compatibility problems are more likely to strike corporate users, as they involve corporate VPN and security software. Companies will need to apply the relevant patches for the third-party applications before they can roll out the Windows 10 update.

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Posted in microsoft, october 2018 update, patch, Tech, updates, Windows, Windows 10, Windows Update | Comments (0)

How I went from testing a fancy new graphics card to shouting at Windows 10

November 24th, 2018
The below article has nothing to do with a Surface Pro. But after my headaches, I wanted to smash <em>any</em> Windows logo with a mallet.

Enlarge / The below article has nothing to do with a Surface Pro. But after my headaches, I wanted to smash any Windows logo with a mallet. (credit: Lora Machkovech)

Sometimes at Ars Technica, a staffer has to call in "sick" for reasons other than illness, emergency, or hangover. Those are all poor working states, but I would argue that one is even worse: a computer meltdown.

Everyone on staff has suffered at least one of these (or its awful cousin, the ISP outage) and been left distracted or set back to some extent. But when the crash in question happens to the thing you're supposed to test? That's a problem.

And when it happens because you used official Microsoft downloads? Oh, that's an Ars article.

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Posted in battlefield v, Gaming & Culture, Windows 10 | Comments (0)

63 New Flaws (Including 0-Days) Windows Users Need to Patch Now

November 14th, 2018
It's Patch Tuesday once again…time for another round of security updates for the Windows operating system and other Microsoft products. This month Windows users and system administrators need to immediately take care of a total of 63 security vulnerabilities, of which 12 are rated critical, 49 important and one moderate and one low in severity. <!-- adsense --> Two of the vulnerabilities

Posted in hacking news, microsoft, Microsoft Patch Tuesday, Microsoft update, Security patch Update, Vulnerability, Windows 10, Zero-Day Vulnerability | Comments (0)

New APIs Suggest WPA3 Wi-Fi Security Support Coming Soon to Windows 10

November 12th, 2018
Windows 10 users don't have to wait much longer for the support of latest WPA3 Wi-Fi security standard, a new blog post from Microsoft apparently revealed. The third version of Wi-Fi Protected Access, in-short WPA3, is the next generation of the wireless security protocol that has been designed to make it harder for attackers to hack WiFi password. WPA3 was officially launched earlier this

Posted in wifi hacking software, wifi security, Windows 10, Windows 10 Insider Preview Build, WPA password cracking, WPA3, WPA3 Security Protocol, WPA3 Wireless Security | Comments (0)

Windows 10 users finding their legit installs are being deactivated

November 8th, 2018

For reasons that are currently unclear, Windows 10 Professional users are finding that their properly licensed installations are being deactivated.

On systems affected by the issue, Windows is complaining that a Windows 10 Home license key is being used with a Windows 10 Pro installation. To fix things, the system needs to be wiped and Windows 10 Home installed. Otherwise, a genuine Windows 10 Pro key needs to be used.

Microsoft has acknowledged that the problem exists and that some unspecified issue with the Windows Authentication servers is causing the problem, but as yet, there's no fix. The Windows 10 Pro licenses do seem to be valid, and some resolution is promised within a couple of business days.

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Posted in bug, microsoft, product activation, Tech, Windows, Windows 10 | Comments (0)

Windows 10 Bug Let UWP Apps Access All Files Without Users’ Consent

October 30th, 2018
Microsoft silently patched a bug in its Windows 10 operating system with the October 2018 update (version 1809) that allowed Microsoft Store apps with extensive file system permission to access all files on users' computers without their consent. With Windows 10, Microsoft introduced a common platform, called Universal Windows Platform (UWP), that allows apps to run on any device running

Posted in app development, Microsoft Windows 10, universal windows platform, Windows 10, Windows App Development, Windows App Store, Windows Apps | Comments (0)

Half of enterprise machines run Windows 10, as Windows 7’s end of life looms

October 25th, 2018
Who doesn't love some new Windows?

Enlarge / Who doesn't love some new Windows? (credit: Peter Bright / Flickr)

On Microsoft's earnings call for the first quarter of its 2019 financial year, CEO Satya Nadella said that "more than half of the commercial device installed base is on Windows 10."

A Microsoft spokesperson "clarified" this to say, "based on Microsoft's data, we can see that there are now more devices in the enterprise running Windows 10 than any other previous version of Windows." That description offers a little more wriggle room; Windows 10 might only have a plurality share of enterprise systems rather than the majority share Nadella claimed. But either way, a substantial number of machines in the enterprise are currently running Windows 10.

Equally, however, it means that there's a substantial number of machines not running Windows 10. Those systems are likely to be running Windows 7. Windows 7 is due to drop out of support in January 2020. Beyond that date, Windows 7 users will either have to pay for up to three years of patches or switch to Microsoft-hosted virtual machines, which will receive the three additional years of patching at no cost.

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Posted in enterprise, microsoft, support, Tech, Windows, Windows 10, windows 7 | Comments (0)

Windows 10 to Get Built-in Protection Against Most Ransomware Attacks

June 30th, 2017

Ransomware Ransomware Everywhere Not a Single Place to Hide!

But, Microsoft has a simple solution to this problem to protect millions of its users against most ransomware attacks.

Two massive ransomware attacks — WannaCry and Petya (also known as NotPetya) — in a month have caused chaos and disruption worldwide, forcing hospitals, ATMs, shipping companies, governments, airports and car

Posted in anti-ransomware, Controlled folder access, EMET, hacking news, NotPetya ransomware, Petya ransomware, ransomware, WannaCry Ransomware, Windows 10, Windows 10 Insider Preview Build, Windows Defender | Comments (0)