Archive for the ‘facebook’ Category

Facebook’s evolutionary search for crashing software bugs

August 22nd, 2017

Enlarge (credit: Adobe Stock)

With 1.3 billion daily users, the Facebook site and its apps are the most-used pieces of software in the world. Only a handful of software companies have ascended to a similar echelon of ubiquity, including Microsoft, Google, and Apple. For better or worse, that is the world we now live in, where a large percentage our waking hours is spent interacting with software—and Facebook leads the pack, with the average user spending 50 minutes per day mostly watching videos and liking photos of babies. Television is the only leisure activity in the world that receives more attention than Facebook. And don't forget that Facebook now owns Instagram and WhatsApp, too.

It is understandable, then, that Facebook cares a lot about the quality of its software. If Facebook pushes out a new version of its Android app with a crashing bug, millions of users could be affected. Those users might be inclined to switch to another social network, or even worse: put down their phone and interact with the real world. The net effect is the same, either way: Facebook's share of your attention, and thus potential revenue, decreases.

That's why Facebook has some advanced bug-finding tools—including a devilishly clever dynamic analysis tool, initially devised by students at University College London and then acquired and further developed by Facebook's London office. This is the first time they've shown the inner workings of this new tool, dubbed Sapienz, to the press.

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Posted in Biz & IT, dynamic analysis, facebook, infer, sapienz, software bugs, static analysis, Tech | Comments (0)

Instagram Takes Huge Step to Filter Bullies, Become a Kinder Social Hub

August 22nd, 2017

You’re a jerk.
You’re a fat pig.
You’re disgusting. 

It’s hard to imagine seeing these words written about anyone, but it happens every minute online. But hopefully, Instagram users will be noticing a kinder vibe thanks to the platform’s decision to automatically delete hateful, bullying comments.

Instagram, the third most popular social network with 700 million users, announced its filtering move shortly after one  UK study found that more youths experienced depression and cyberbullying on Instagram than any other platform.
A filtering win for families
This latest move is a huge win for families and specifically, teens, who now consider the photo-driven Instagram their favorite platform behind Snapchat.
During the CBSN: On Assignment show this week that broke the story, Wired magazine editor-in-chief Nicholas Thompson asked Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom, “What if this fails? What if people actually get turned off by Instagram, and they say ‘Instagram is becoming like Disneyland, I don’t want to be there’ . . . and they share less?”

To which Systrom replied, “I’ve had numerous product ideas at Instagram that were total failures, and that’s okay. Maybe trying sends a signal to other companies that this is a priority and starts a national and international conversation. I think that will be the success.”
Can we please give Systrom an award for using his platform’s incredible influence and power for good? It will be interesting to see in the months ahead how other platforms respond to Instagram’s kindness initiative.
Even with Instagram leading the charge for a kinder Internet, we know the most efficient behavior filters begin at home. Here are a few reminders to help kids can steer clear of bullies online.
5 Ways to Help Kids Avoid Bullies 
  1. Make profiles and photos private. By refusing to use privacy settings (and some kids do refuse), a child’s profile is open everyone, which increases the chances of being bullied or personal photos being downloaded and manipulated. We recommend that parents require kids under 18 to make all social profiles private. Private accounts limit online circles to known friends and reduce the possibility of cyberbullying.
  2. Avoid anonymous apps. Apps that allow anonymous accounts can be invitations to heartache. Apps like Ask.fm, that Tumblr, YikYak, and a handful of other apps should be limited. Reports have linked several of these apps to severe and even tragic cyberbullying cases.
  3. Tell someone. If your child does get bullied, encourage him or her to tell someone; if not you then a trusted teacher or family friend. Never tell a child to ignore the bullying or bully in return. Social media has changed the impact and consequences of bullying and in turn, how we need to respond to it.
  4. Look for signs of bullying. Being the target of a cyberbully creates fear, humiliation, and can lead to isolation, so your child will rarely be the first to speak up about it. So, look out for the signs your child is being bullied such as falling grades, loss of appetite, refusing to go to school, or ongoing sadness or moodiness. Be aware and willing to press in to help your child.
  5. Save any evidence, report abuse. Print copies of messages, texts, and photos used to threaten or intimidate. Take screen shots of posts or comments on social networks. Report abusive accounts, comments, and ongoing conflict to the social network in the Help section. If the cyberbullying includes threats, intimidation, or sexual extortion of any kind report it to the police immediately.

We certainly applaud Instagram for being the first giant social platform to put such strong anti-bullying measures in place, but we also have the everyday parenting work to do in our own homes. The best anti-bullying plan? Be available for your kids, listen a lot, communicate often, and let them know without a doubt that you have their backs.

ToniTwitterHS

 

Toni Birdsong is a Family Safety Evangelist to McAfee. You can find her on Twitter @IntelSec_Family. (Disclosures).

The post Instagram Takes Huge Step to Filter Bullies, Become a Kinder Social Hub appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in anonymous apps, anti-bullying, cyberbullying, digicit, empathy online, facebook, Family Safety, filtering, Instagram, kindness online, protecting kids online, snapchat, social networking | Comments (0)

Instagram Takes Huge Step to Filter Bullies, Become a Kinder Social Hub

August 22nd, 2017

You’re a jerk.
You’re a fat pig.
You’re disgusting. 

It’s hard to imagine seeing these words written about anyone, but it happens every minute online. But hopefully, Instagram users will be noticing a kinder vibe thanks to the platform’s decision to automatically delete hateful, bullying comments.

Instagram, the third most popular social network with 700 million users, announced its filtering move shortly after one  UK study found that more youths experienced depression and cyberbullying on Instagram than any other platform.
A filtering win for families
This latest move is a huge win for families and specifically, teens, who now consider the photo-driven Instagram their favorite platform behind Snapchat.
During the CBSN: On Assignment show this week that broke the story, Wired magazine editor-in-chief Nicholas Thompson asked Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom, “What if this fails? What if people actually get turned off by Instagram, and they say ‘Instagram is becoming like Disneyland, I don’t want to be there’ . . . and they share less?”

To which Systrom replied, “I’ve had numerous product ideas at Instagram that were total failures, and that’s okay. Maybe trying sends a signal to other companies that this is a priority and starts a national and international conversation. I think that will be the success.”
Can we please give Systrom an award for using his platform’s incredible influence and power for good? It will be interesting to see in the months ahead how other platforms respond to Instagram’s kindness initiative.
Even with Instagram leading the charge for a kinder Internet, we know the most efficient behavior filters begin at home. Here are a few reminders to help kids can steer clear of bullies online.
5 Ways to Help Kids Avoid Bullies 
  1. Make profiles and photos private. By refusing to use privacy settings (and some kids do refuse), a child’s profile is open everyone, which increases the chances of being bullied or personal photos being downloaded and manipulated. We recommend that parents require kids under 18 to make all social profiles private. Private accounts limit online circles to known friends and reduce the possibility of cyberbullying.
  2. Avoid anonymous apps. Apps that allow anonymous accounts can be invitations to heartache. Apps like Ask.fm, that Tumblr, YikYak, and a handful of other apps should be limited. Reports have linked several of these apps to severe and even tragic cyberbullying cases.
  3. Tell someone. If your child does get bullied, encourage him or her to tell someone; if not you then a trusted teacher or family friend. Never tell a child to ignore the bullying or bully in return. Social media has changed the impact and consequences of bullying and in turn, how we need to respond to it.
  4. Look for signs of bullying. Being the target of a cyberbully creates fear, humiliation, and can lead to isolation, so your child will rarely be the first to speak up about it. So, look out for the signs your child is being bullied such as falling grades, loss of appetite, refusing to go to school, or ongoing sadness or moodiness. Be aware and willing to press in to help your child.
  5. Save any evidence, report abuse. Print copies of messages, texts, and photos used to threaten or intimidate. Take screen shots of posts or comments on social networks. Report abusive accounts, comments, and ongoing conflict to the social network in the Help section. If the cyberbullying includes threats, intimidation, or sexual extortion of any kind report it to the police immediately.

We certainly applaud Instagram for being the first giant social platform to put such strong anti-bullying measures in place, but we also have the everyday parenting work to do in our own homes. The best anti-bullying plan? Be available for your kids, listen a lot, communicate often, and let them know without a doubt that you have their backs.

ToniTwitterHS

 

Toni Birdsong is a Family Safety Evangelist to McAfee. You can find her on Twitter @IntelSec_Family. (Disclosures).

The post Instagram Takes Huge Step to Filter Bullies, Become a Kinder Social Hub appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in anonymous apps, anti-bullying, cyberbullying, digicit, empathy online, facebook, Family Safety, filtering, Instagram, kindness online, protecting kids online, snapchat, social networking | Comments (0)

Facebook Awards $100K to Researchers for Credential Spearphishing Detection Method

August 21st, 2017
Researchers who identified a real-time way to detect credential spearphishing attacks in enterprise settings won $100,000 from Facebook last week.

Posted in detection, facebook, Internet Defense Prize, phishing, spearphishing, Usenix, Web Security | Comments (0)

Sony Hacked Again: OurMine Hacks PlayStation’ Twitter and Facebook

August 21st, 2017

By Waqas

OurMine, a Saudi Arabia based hacking group hacked the official

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Sony Hacked Again: OurMine Hacks PlayStation’ Twitter and Facebook

Posted in Cyber Attack, Cyber Crime, facebook, gaming, Hacking, hacking news, Internet, ourmine, PSN, security, twitter | Comments (0)

Man hacks top British News platform to get social media followers

August 19th, 2017

By Carolina

Some hack for fun while some do it for political

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Man hacks top British News platform to get social media followers

Posted in Cyber Crime, facebook, Hacking, hacking news, Instagram, Internet, Iraq, security, social media, Social Network News, Technology | Comments (0)

News in brief: new Bitcoin fork; HBO hacked; China cracks down

August 17th, 2017
Your daily round-up of some of the other stories in the news

Posted in bitcoin, bitcoin cash, Blockchain, china, cryptography, facebook, Game of Thrones, Great Firewall of China, HBO, Law & order, news in brief, twitter, VPN | Comments (0)

Social media accounts of HBO, Game of Thrones and others hacked

August 17th, 2017

By Carolina

OurMine, a Saudi Arabia based hacking group hacked the official

This is a post from HackRead.com Read the original post: Social media accounts of HBO, Game of Thrones and others hacked

Posted in Cyber Attack, Cyber Crime, facebook, Hacking, hacking news, HBO, Internet, ourmine, security, social media, Social Network News, Technology, twitter | Comments (0)

Flash’s Final Countdown Has Begun

August 16th, 2017
The impending demise of Adobe Flash will create legacy challenges similar to Windows XP as companies begin to wean themselves off the vulnerable code base.

Posted in adobe, Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Flash Vulnerabilities, Animate CC, apple, facebook, flash player, Flash Professional CC, google, Hacking Team breach, hacks, html5, malware, Microsoft, mozilla, Open Source, Steve Jobs, vulnerabilities, Web Security, Windows XP end of life | Comments (0)

McAfee Survey: Parental Input on Tech Safety Declines as Kids Get Older

August 15th, 2017

It’s natural for parents to gradually extend a child more freedom and responsibility as that child matures. Finding the magic formula of how much to hang on and how much to let go and in what areas is the holy grail of parenting tween or teenager.

A recent McAfee survey echoed this dilemma when it comes to digital parenting. According to the survey, Cybersecurity 101: Teens in the Classroom, parents are starting off strong with educating kids on cyber security, but as they get older that education begins to taper off.

Highlights of the survey that polled more than 3,900 high school students (9th-12th grade) from around the world include:

  • 38% of the parents regularly talk with their (14 to 18-year-old) children about how to stay safe
  • 50% of the parents of 14 to 15 year- old children regularly talk about staying safe online, but for 16 to 18-year-old children, this percentage has dropped to 30%.

The survey also revealed that 14% of 16 to 18-year-olds have never talked with their parents about how to stay safe online.

~~~

These numbers are concerning for several reasons. First, the ages 16-18 are critical in so many digital safety areas namely: cyberbullying, online reputation management (college prep), catfishing, cheating in the classroom, and distracted driving. Second, if you consider today’s headlines, many of the digital missteps in cybersecurity happen to kids in this age group. And third, we know that as much as our children like to think they know everything there is to know about online safety (and many other subjects), their still-developing brains and lack of maturity and life experience makes them vulnerable to digital disasters.

With new information comes the power to change. So if you fall into the category of a parent who eases up on digital safety now that your kids are getting older, put the brakes on that thinking.

5 discussions to reignite with your teen:

  1. Cyberbullying. The act of bullying online comes in many forms. It can come in a threat of physical harm, in passive aggressive statements, in racist or hate comments, in coded ranking systems, and in endless forms of exclusion. Because Snapchat, Instagram, and texting are where teens hang out all day, being bullied in these very public online spaces can become an emotional torture chamber for a teen. Be aware of changes in your child’s behavior, be available, and be intentional about noticing social changes such as new friends coming into the picture and friend group rifts. Simply being available to talk and being aware of your child’s emotional changes goes a long way in combating this critical issue.
  2. Cybersecurity in the classroom. It’s a boring subject for teens to discuss, but cybersecurity in school is a big deal. Rules are in place for a reason, namely to keep kids safe and focused on learning. So, reiterating online privacy, respect for technology, and using technology responsibly while in school can head off a lot of issues — like cheating and privacy issues — this school year.
  3. Depression and technology. It’s startlingly but true: Research suggests a link between spending extended time on social media and experiencing depression. Also alarming is that suicide among teen girls between the ages of 15 and 19 has hit a 40-year high, according to new data released by the National Center for Health Statistics. Know the signs of depression and the link between depression and social media.
  4. Distracted Driving. This may be the most important, consistent conversation you can have with your teen since distracted driving is now the #1 cause of teen crashes. Although many teen drivers think they can get away with distracted driving, it only takes seconds to cause a catastrophic car accident.
  5. Balance. There is a very real condition, and it’s called smart phone addiction. Know the signs of tech addiction in your child and be unafraid to step in and make the necessary changes. Get intentional about helping your child strike a balance between tech use and real life experiences. Racking up likes on Instagram can be a thrill but nothing — absolutely nothing — compares to venturing outside and enjoying nature, exercising, doing something creative, connecting with friends face-to-face, and learning how to be fully present each day.

In short, teens need parental input more than ever especially when it comes to the many emotional, physical, and mental issues technology ushers into a teen’s world. So, don’t be afraid to repeat yourself. Don’t apologize for setting boundaries. And, never hold back when it comes to helping handle the very important issues that affect your child’s safety and emotional well-being. Parental influence is short lived and so very critical in the life of a digital teen.

ToniTwitterHS

 

Toni Birdsong is a Family Safety Evangelist to McAfee. You can find her on Twitter @IntelSec_Family. (Disclosures).

The post McAfee Survey: Parental Input on Tech Safety Declines as Kids Get Older appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted in cyberbullying, depression and teens, distracted driving, facebook, Family Safety, protecting kids online, social media, social networking, technology addiction, unplugged | Comments (0)