The Unbearable Lightness of Animal Crossing

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
Many years before the rise of walking-paced exploration games, *Animal Crossing* captured the lovely melancholy of pointless perambulation.

Posted in Backchannel | Comments (0)

New iPhones Should Be Here Soon. Will People Buy Them?

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
We’re on the precipice of a downturn in consumer spending, and the mobile device market may take a very big hit.

Posted in Gear, Gear / Products / Phones, Gear / Trends | Comments (0)

Gig Workers’ New Unemployment Benefits Won’t Come Quickly

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
The $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill makes contractors eligible for unemployment insurance. But states want pay stubs that ride-hail drivers don't have.

Posted in Transportation, Transportation / Ride Hailing | Comments (0)

In Italy, the TV Show Big Brother Is Now Everyone’s Reality

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
Contestants on Italy's version of Big Brother had a jump-start on life under quarantine. Now they return to a world both familiar and alien.

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Asus ROG Zephyrus G14—Ryzen 7nm mobile is here, and it’s awesome

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder

We've been excited about getting our hands on AMD's 7nm laptop parts for a long time now—even before visiting AMD's campus in Austin last month for a sneak preview. Originally, we were supposed to come home from AMD with a laptop in hand to test, but the novel coronavirus had its way with this as with many other products.

We did eventually get one of Asus' Zephyrus G14 gaming laptops with a top-of-the-line Ryzen 9 4900HS, though—and after several days of testing, we're ready to talk about it.

Overview

Specs at a glance: Asus ROG Zephyrus G14, as tested
OS Windows 10 Home
CPU 3.3GHz 8-core AMD Ryzen 9 3900HS (4.4GHz boost)
RAM 16GB DDR43200
GPU AMD Radeon 8 core / Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 MaxQ
SSD Intel 660p M.2 NVMe PCIe3.0 1TB
Battery ASUStek 76000 mWh
Display 1080p, non-glare, 120Hz, adaptive sync
Connectivity
  • two USB-B ports
  • two USB-C ports
  • 3.5mm phone/mic combo jack
  • DC power jack
  • full-size HDMI out
  • Kensington lock slot
Price as tested $1,449.99 at Best Buy and Asus

The Zephyrus G14 is a surprisingly small and sleek build for a full-on gaming laptop—and make no mistake about it, that's precisely what this beast is. At first glance, the 18mm-thick Zephyrus looks more like an ultraportable design than a gaming laptop. (For reference, the Acer C720 11" Chromebooks were 19mm thick.)

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Posted in Gaming Laptop, laptop, Ryzen 4000, Tech | Comments (0)

Scientists ponder how jugglers seem to defy limits to human reaction times

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
https://cdn.arstechnica.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/juggleTOP.jpg

Enlarge / Scientists have long been fascinated with the math and mechanics of juggling. (credit: Todd Davidson PTY LTD/Getty Images)

The fastest expert jugglers can make nearly 500 catches per minute, which translates into just 120 miliseconds per catch—faster than human reaction times even in high-speed sports like tennis, in which a player typically takes 200 milliseconds to adjust their performance. The Guinness world record for juggling is currently 11 balls. Troy Shinbrot, a biomedical engineer at Rutgers University, and Rutgers undergraduate math major Jonah Botvinick-Greenhouse explored the question of how expert jugglers can achieve these remarkable feats in a recent article in Physics Today.

Master jugglers are clearly very good at multitasking, and since balls aren't being thrown randomly, each ball need not be tracked and caught independently. But Botvinick-Greenhouse and Shinbrot still wondered how it was possible for jugglers with reaction times of 200 milliseconds to routinely catch balls every 120 milliseconds. "Jugglers rely on making accurate throws and predictions of where the balls will travel," the authors wrote. "The accuracy required is a measure of how unstable—and thus how difficult—a particular juggling pattern is."

Juggling has a long and glorious history dating back to ancient Egypt; there are hieroglyphics circa 1994 and 1781 BCE that historians consider to be the earliest historical record of juggling. There were juggling warriors in China (770-476 BCE)—apparently it was viewed as an effective diversionary tactic—and the practice eventually spread to ancient Greece and Rome. By the mid-1800s CE, juggling was largely practiced by circus and street performers, and it has fascinated scientists since at least 1903. That's when Edgar James Swift published a paper looking at the psychology and physiology of learning in the American Journal of Psychology, which discussed the rate at which students learned to toss two balls in one hand.

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Posted in applied physics, Gaming & Culture, juggling, Physics, science | Comments (0)

Dark Nexus: A New Emerging IoT Botnet Malware Spotted in the Wild

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
Cybersecurity researchers have discovered a new emerging IoT botnet threat that leverages compromised smart devices to stage 'distributed denial-of-service' attacks, potentially triggered on-demand through platforms offering DDoS-for-hire services. The botnet, named "dark_nexus" by Bitdefender researchers, works by employing credential stuffing attacks against a variety of devices, such as

Posted in Botnet, botnet malware, Cyber Attack, ddos attack, DDoS booters, IoT botnet, secure smart devices | Comments (0)

Tale of two hypervisor bugs – Escaping from FreeBSD bhyve

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/moviuro
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Posted in netsec | Comments (0)

Universally Evading Sysmon and ETW

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/0xdea
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Posted in netsec | Comments (0)

Integrity Policy Enforcement: IPE is a Linux Security Module from Microsoft, which allows for a configurable policy to enforce integrity requirements on the whole system. It attempts to solve the issue of code integrity: that any code being executed (or files being read).

April 8th, 2020
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/digicat
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Posted in netsec | Comments (0)