Artifact beta: Learn how to play Valve’s first card game… and how to pay

November 18th, 2018
by The Feeder
Artifact beta: home screen

Enlarge / It's a beta! A beta that will take your money. (credit: Valve Software)

Valve's next video game, a card-battling computer game called Artifact, will be a tricky one to review for a few reasons. For one, it inevitably comes with the baggage of being "Valve's next video game." Whatever Artifact is, it isn't one of the company's innovative first-person shooters.

But the bigger issue, for a review's sake, applies to any modern card game: cards, cards, cards. The genre's fun and strategy depends on hundreds of these things. Exactly how many are there? How do they interact with each other? And how do players get their hands on more of them?

We can start answering those questions with the Artifact beta, into which Valve sneaked us ahead of the closed-beta period (that period is supposed to start on Monday the 19th for anyone who claimed a beta key at various expos like PAX West). With only one day of play under our belts, we cannot come close to "reviewing" what's on offer thus far.

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Posted in artifact, dota 2, Gaming & Culture, Valve Software | Comments (0)

Popular Dark Web hosting provider got hacked, 6,500 sites down (ZDNet)

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder

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Compare: WebARX, MalCare, Sucuri, WordFence, iThemesSecurity, SiteLock, SecuPress and CloudFlare

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
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BYOB (Build Your Own Botnet) v0.4 Released – New Spreader Module For Worm-like Behavior

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
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Taking Down an Insider Threat: story of a failed pentest

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
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The Boring Company’s first tunnel is all dug up

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder

On Friday night, Boring Company CEO Elon Musk tweeted images of his tunnel-boring machine appearing to emerge from the dirt into a cavernous hole, with bystanders at the hole's edge watching the spinning boring head.

The tunnel began in January 2017 in the parking lot of SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California. Musk's goal has been to improve the speed and cost of tunnel boring, not only to alleviate surface-street traffic by lowering cars onto electric skates and then speeding them through a so-called "loop" system, but also to potentially dig sewer, water, and electrical tunnels for cities in a more cost-effective manner.

In late October, Musk tweeted that the more-than-two-mile-long Hawthorne tunnel would be completed by December 10, and The Boring Company would celebrate by giving rides to the public.

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Posted in cars, Elon Musk, Energy, the boring company, Transportation, tunnel | Comments (0)

Julian Assange Charges, Japan’s Top Cybersecurity Official, and More Security News This Week

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
Safer browsing, more bitcoin scams, and the rest of the week's top security news.

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Sunset Overdrive review: Ride the rails to kaboom-town (finally on PCs, too)

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
Throw traps, shoot guns, grind rails: that's the <em>Sunset Overdrive</em> way.

Throw traps, shoot guns, grind rails: that's the Sunset Overdrive way.

Update: There's no shortage of new games this 2018 holiday season, but we wanted to bring a surprise gem to your attention: 2014's Sunset Overdrive, a high-octane, parkour-driven visual stunner. With seemingly zero fanfare, a PC version arrived yesterday for Windows PCs (Steam, Windows Store). Nearly everything about the original games still applies to this PC version, so enjoy our original review (which first ran on October 29, 2014) below. The piece appears largely unchanged, but we have added some PC-specific thoughts (finally, Sunset in 60fps!) and a gallery from the new edition near the end.

Keep moving, keep moving, keep moving. If I stay still, the monsters attack. If I stop sliding down rails, bouncing off of car hoods, or rappelling over zip lines, everything falls apart—the music in my head stops playing; the electricity stops surging through my dodge-rolls; the fire stops spewing from my duct-taped battle-axe.

Welcome to Sunset City, a sunny, dilapidated corpse of a not-so-futuristic riverside metropolis. The place used to be overrun by selfie-snapping hipsters until they chugged a brand-new energy drink that turned them into crazed mutants (we mean literally, as opposed to the figurative craze of a caffeine high). Somehow, "you" (by way of a relatively robust character creator, which happens to sport the dumbest hairstyles known to man) avoided taking a sip, and now you must survive and escape the madness alongside the few remaining human survivors.

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Posted in Gaming & Culture, Insomniac Games, Ratchet and Clank, sunset overdrive, Xbox One | Comments (0)

Enigmatic ridges on Pluto may be the remains of vanished nitrogen glaciers

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder
Image of Pluto's surface.

Enlarge / Washboard terrain fills the basins in the right of this image. (credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

As we've gathered more details about the other planets of the Solar System, we've largely managed to explain the geography we've found by drawing analogies to things we're familiar with from Earth. Glaciers and wind-driven erosion produce similar results both here and on Mars, for instance. But further out in the Solar System, the materials involved in the geology change—water ice becomes as hard as rock, and methane and nitrogen freeze—which raises the prospect of some entirely unfamiliar processes.

This week, scientists proposed that some weird terrain found on Pluto could be the product of large fields of nitrogen ice sublimating off into the atmosphere. While this explanation could account for some properties of Pluto's geography, it doesn't explain why the process resulted in a series of parallel ridges.

On the washboard

The strange terrain lies to the northwest of Sputnik Planitia, the heart-shaped plane that dominates the side of Pluto we have the best images of. Called "washboard" or "fluted," the area consists of large numbers of roughly parallel ridges with roughly a kilometer or two separating them. Aside from their appearance and general orientation, these ridges don't seem to have a lot in common. They're discontiguous and don't fill the entire region. They run down slopes and spread across valley floors—in some cases a single ridge will run down a slope and then flatten out. And in several cases, they create a starburst-like pattern on along the walls of craters.

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Posted in astronomy, glaciers, New Horizons, planetary science, Pluto, science | Comments (0)

SMS 2FA database leak drama, MageCart mishaps, Black Friday badware, and more (The Register)

November 17th, 2018
by The Feeder

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