XSSing Google Code-in thanks to improperly escaped JSON data

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/ThomasCZ
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The 5 Hacking Newsletter

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
submitted by /u/s14ve
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‘Bomb threat’ scammers are now threatening to throw acid on victims (ZDNet)

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder

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Space Photos of the Week: It’s Love vs. Hate in Star vs. Star

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
Binary stars have a sort of relationship, but not one you’d want to be in.

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Signal app to Australia: Good luck with that crypto ban

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
Grafitti urging people to use Signal, a highly-enctypted messaging app, is spray-painted on a wall during a protest on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California.

Enlarge / Grafitti urging people to use Signal, a highly-enctypted messaging app, is spray-painted on a wall during a protest on February 1, 2017 in Berkeley, California. (credit: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

Signal, one of the most secure messaging apps, essentially told Australia this week that its attempts to thwart strong crypto are rather cute.

"By design, Signal does not have a record of your contacts, social graph, conversation list, location, user avatar, user profile name, group memberships, group titles, or group avatars," Joshua Lund, a Signal developer wrote. "The end-to-end encrypted contents of every message and voice/video call are protected by keys that are entirely inaccessible to us. In most cases now we don’t even have access to who is messaging whom."

Lund is referring to a recent law passed in Australia that will fine companies that do not comply with government demands for encrypted data up to AUS$10 million.

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Posted in crypto, encryption, Policy, Signal | Comments (0)

Taylor Swift’s Facial Recognition, the Year’s Worst Passwords, and More Security News This Week

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
Chinese hackers targeting the Navy, charity scammers, and more security news this week.

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‘The Endless’ Is a Masterful Low-Budget Sci-Fi Movie

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
The latest from Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead is everything studio movies are not.

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Computing pioneer Evelyn Berezin died this week—she should be remembered

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
Secretaries use typewriters, before the word processor changed everything.

Enlarge / Secretaries use typewriters, before the word processor changed everything. (credit: Evening Standard | Getty Images)

Computing pioneer Evelyn Berezin died at 93 this week. She was most known as the designer of the first true word-processing computer. But she designed many other innovative computing systems and helmed Redactron Corporation, a company that helped transform offices by producing and distributing her word-processor device.

Born to Jewish immigrants from Russia in New York City in 1925, Berezin earned a BA in physics at NYU before working throughout the 1950s and 1960s designing early computing systems. She had become interested in physics after reading her brother's science-fiction periodicals.

In the earlier years of her career, she worked amidst a wave of innovation and new possibilities that came with the arrival of transistors. Among her early accomplishments was an airline reservations system for United Airlines, which "served 60 cities throughout the United States with a one-second response time and with no central system failures in 11 years of operation," according to the Computer History Museum.

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Posted in Evelyn Berezin, obituary, Tech, word processor | Comments (0)

Amazon Echo Review: Which Echo or Alexa Speaker is Best?

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
Should you get the Echo Dot, or the Echo Plus? And what's up with that Echo Show? Here's what to consider.

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KeyForge: The red-hot card game where every deck is unique—and unchangeable

December 15th, 2018
by The Feeder
KeyForge: The red-hot card game where every deck is unique—and unchangeable

Enlarge (credit: Charlie Theel)

As a concept, KeyForge is enthralling. The game is the latest effort from legendary Magic: The Gathering designer Richard Garfield—and the big idea here is that every sealed deck is unique. Decks are pre-constructed and can’t be altered; there’s no card chasing, and there’s certainly no over-arching “meta” game that must be respected. This is a head-to-head two-player battler like no other.

The “unique” gimmick is great. The initial card pool numbers 370, and each 37-card deck you snag off the shelf consists of a completely one-of-a-kind mixture. This is accomplished via cryptic algorithms that govern deck construction. These 37 cards become your deck, your personalized slice of KeyForge that no one can take away. The bizarre naming conventions of each set only further the mystique and foster an emotional attachment to your cards.

Keys and vaults

Yes, there is a setting for KeyForge, but it’s almost irrelevant. Your deck represents the followers and the abilities of an Archon, an all-powerful being. These Archons live and die in the artificial world of the Crucible. This maelstrom is a ravaged place where champions scavenge keys in hope of unlocking hallowed vaults. So we battle as we always do.

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Posted in ars cardboard, Gaming & Culture, keyforge, magic the gathering, richard garfield | Comments (0)